The Cambridge Companion to Ockham

Front Cover
Paul Vincent Spade
Cambridge University Press, Dec 13, 1999 - Philosophy - 420 pages
2 Reviews
The Franciscan William of Ockham was an English medieval philosopher, theologian, and political theorist. Ockham is important not only in the history of philosophy and theology, but also in the development of early modern science and of modern notions of property rights and church-state relations. This volume offers a full discussion of all significant aspects of Ockham's thought: logic, philosophy of language, metaphysics and natural philosophy, epistemology, ethics, action theory, political thought and theology. It is the first study of Ockham in any language to make full use of the new critical editions of his works, and to consider recent discoveries concerning his life, education, and influences.
  

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Contents

The Academic and Intellectual Worlds of Ockham
17
Some Aspects of Ockhams Logic
31
Semantics and Mental Language
53
Is There Synonymy in Okhams Mental Language?
76
Ockhams Nominalist Metaphysics Some Main Themes
100
Ockhams Semantics and Ontology of the Categories
118
Ockhams Philosophy of Nature
143
The Mechanisms of Cognition Ockham on Mediating Species
168
Ockham on Will Nature and Morality
245
Natural Law and Moral Omnipotence
273
The Political Writings
302
Ockham on Faith and Reason
326
Ockhams Repudiation of Pelagianism
350
Bibliography
375
Citations of Works Attributed to Ockham
397
Index
403

Ockhams Misunderstood Theory of Intuitive and Abstractive Cognition
204
Ockhams Ethical Theory
227

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Page xi - Associate Director of the Center for Consciousness Studies at the University of Arizona, and author of The Conscious Mind (1996).
Page 16 - ... Pope. Let us close this short sketch with the words in which Ockham expressed his ideal of a commonwealth of all nations : 'Therefore, he is not truly zealous for the common good, who does not desire and work, as far as he can in his station, for the whole world to be subject to one monarch'.1 * * * Ockham's philosophy had an enormous influence. But it seems that he had few disciples. It is difficult to find an 'Ockhamist' school in the same sense as we encounter a Thomist or Scotist school....

References to this book

Mind and Knowledge
Robert Pasnau
Limited preview - 2002
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About the author (1999)

Spade is Professor of Philosophy at Indiana University.

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