The highwaymen of Wiltshire; or A narrative of the adventurous career and untimely end of divers freebooters and smugglers (Google eBook)

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1856
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1856/ n.p./ 31

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Page 88 - The one in advance was sturdy and strong, With arms uncommonly bony and long, And his Guernsey shirt Was all pitch and dirt, Which sailors don't think inconvenient or wrong. He was very broad-breasted, And very deepchested ; His sinewy frame correspond with the rest did, Except as to height, for he could not be more At the most, you would say, than some five feet four. And, if measured, perhaps had been found a thought lower. Dame Nature, in fact, — whom some person or other, — A Poet, — has...
Page 89 - Lavington road Branch'd off to the left from the one to Devizes ; And thither the footsteps of Waters seem'd tending, Though a doubt might exist of the course he was bending, To a landsman, at least, who, wherever he goes, Is content, for the most part, to follow his nose ; — While Harry kept ' backing' And filling' — and
Page 4 - Sometimes, indeed, he was a man of good family and education. A romantic interest therefore attached, and perhaps still attaches, to the names of freebooters of this class. The vulgar eagerly drank in tales of their ferocity and audacity, of their occasional acts of generosity and good nature, of their amours, of their miraculous escapes, of their desperate struggles, and of their manly bearing at the bar and in the cart.
Page 88 - I'd have you to know That a great while ago, — The best part of a century, may be, or so, — Across this same plain, so dull and so dreary, A couple of Travellers, way-worn and weary, Were making their way ; Their profession, you'd...
Page 89 - For, though he would give an occasional hitch, Sailor-like to his ' slops,' there was something, the which, On the whole, savour'd more of the pipe-clay than pitch. — Such were now the two men who appear'd on the hill, Harry Waters the tall one, the short
Page 87 - O H, Salisbury Plain is bleak and bare,— At least so I've heard many people declare, For I fairly confess I never was there ;— Not a shrub nor a tree, Nor a bush can you see; No hedges, no ditches, no gates, no stiles, Much less a house, or a cottage for miles ;— —It ‘aa ye 7 sad thing to be caught in the rain When night s coming on upon Salisbury Plain.
Page 88 - And show'd in a moment their real characters, (The accent's so placed on this word by our Jack Tars.) The one in advance was sturdy and strong, With arms uncommonly bony and long, And his Guernsey shirt Was all pitch and dirt, Which sailors don't think inconvenient or wrong. He was very broad-breasted, And very deep-chested ; His sinewy frame correspond with the rest did, Except as to height, for he could not be more At the most, you would say, than some five feet four, And if measured, perhaps had...
Page 45 - January, 1778. — Whereas divers robberies have been lately committed on the road from Devizes to Salisbury, and also near the town of Devizes : and as it is strongly suspected that one Boulter with an accomplice, are the persons concerned in these robberies ; a reward of thirty guineas is offered for apprehending and bringing to justice the said Boulter, and ten guineas for his accomplice, over and above the reward allowed by Act of Parliament : — to be paid, on conviction, at the Bank in Devizes....
Page 105 - And I trust that, through the mediation and merits of our blessed Redeemer, you may there experience that mercy which a due regard to the credit of the paper currency of the country forbids you to hope for here.
Page 79 - Majesty, for the better apprehending and bringing to justice the persons concerned in the murder, is hereby pleased to promise his most gracious pardon to any one of them (except the person who actually...

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