Annals of the Caledonians, Picts, and Scots; and of Strathclyde, Cumberland, Galloway and Murray, by J. Ritson [ed. by J. Frank]. (Google eBook)

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Joseph Ritson, Joseph Frank (of Stockton-on-Tees)
1828
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Page 40 - And nought be heard but sounds of woe ; Whilst the pale phantoms of the slain Glide nightly o'er the silent plain. O baleful cause ! O fatal morn ! Accurs'd to ages yet unborn : The sons against their fathers stood, The parent shed his childrens blood ; Yet, when the rage of battle
Page 39 - Mourn, hapless Caledonia, mourn Thy banish'd peace, thy laurel torn ! Thy sons, for valour long renown'd, Lye slaughter'd on their native ground ; Thy hospitable roofs no more Invite the stranger to the door, In smoaky ruins sunk they lye, The monuments of cruelty. The wretched owner sees afar His all become the prey of war, Bethinks him of his
Page 40 - The victor's soul was not appeased ; The naked and forlorn must feel Devouring names and conquering steel ! The pious mother, doom'd to death, Forsaken wanders o'er the heath ; The bleak wind whistles round her head, Her helpless orphans cry for bread ; Bereft of shelter, food, and friend, She views the
Page 25 - lacessere non ausi: ponendisque insuper castellis spatium fuit. Adnotabant periti, non alium ducem opportunitates locorum sapientius legisse nullum ab Agricola positum castellum aut vi hostium expugnatum, aut pactione ac fuga desertum. Crebrae eruptiones: nam adversas moras obsidionis,
Page 40 - steel ! The pious mother, doom'd to death, Forsaken wanders o'er the heath ; The bleak wind whistles round her head, Her helpless orphans cry for bread ; Bereft of shelter, food, and friend, She views the
Page 17 - I, 408.) It has been asserted by the late George Steevens, esquire, that " the crown of Scotland was originally not hereditary. When a successor," he adds, " was declared in the lifetime of a king (as was often the case) the title of prince of Cumberland was immediately bestowed on him as the mark of his
Page 197 - at 640. all the nations and provinces of Britain, which are divided into four languages, that is, of the Britons, Picts, Scots, and English. DCXXXVI. Garnard filius Wid quatuor annis regnavit.* DCXXXVI. Garnard the son of Wid reigned four years. DCXL.
Page 36 - parva scuta et enormes gladios gerentibus: nam Britannorum gladii sine mucrone complexum armorum, et in aperto pugnam non tolerabant. Igitur ut Batavi miscere ictus, ferire umbonibus, ora foedare; et tractis qui in
Page 212 - the enemy pretending flight into the straights of inaccessible mountains, and, with the greatest part of the forces which he had brought with him, cut off, in the fortieth year of his age, and the fifteenth of his reign, on the thirteenth of the calends of January : from which time the hope and valour of the English realm began to decline, and ever back-ward
Page 36 - eminus certabatur: simul constantia, simul arte Britanni, ingentibus gladiis et brevibus cetris,* missilia nostrorum vitare, v.el excutere, atque ipsi magnam vim telorum superfundere: donee Agricola

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