Memoranda relative to the lines thrown up to cover Lisbon in 1810 (Google eBook)

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1829
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Page 108 - I was enabled to bring the enemy to a stand, and to oblige them to retire without venturing upon any attack, it is but justice to Lieutenant-Colonel Fletcher and the officers of the Royal Engineers, to draw your Lordship's attention to the ability and diligence with which they have executed the works by which these positions have been strengthened to such a degree as to render any attack upon that line occupied by the Allied Army very doubtful, if not entirely hopeless. We are indebted...
Page 119 - In the existing relative state of the Allied and French armies in the Peninsula, it does not appear probable that the enemy have it in their power to make an attack upon Portugal. They must wait for their reinforcements ; and, as the arrival of these may be expected, it remains to be considered what plan of defence shall be adopted for this country. ' The great object in Portugal is the possession of Lisbon and the Tagus, and all our measures must be directed to this object. There is another also...
Page 67 - Gretry the same ; and during the period of the French revolution, — in the short space of eight or ten years, a multitude of national songs of great musical merit...
Page 121 - Tagus, to turn the positions which might be taken up in his front on the north of that river ; to cut off from Lisbon the corps opposed to him ; and to destroy it by an attack in front and rear at the same time. This can be avoided only by the retreat of the right centre, and left of the allies, and their junction at a point at which, from the state...
Page 68 - This might be effected by means of a sunken trench, like a parallel at a siege, made to connect- a whole chain of redoubts. Such an expedient would cover infantry from the fire of guns without impeding their forward movement in line, and openings might be left for the advance of the cavalry and artillery, or they might act in masses on the flanks.
Page 108 - We are indebted for these advantages to Lieut. Colonel Fletcher and the officers of the Royal Engineers, among whom I must particularly mention Captain Chapman, who has given me great assistance upon various occasions.
Page 130 - Lieut. General Viscount Wellington, KB, to Captain , Royal Engineers. (Circular.) ' SIR, ' Rio Mayor, 6th October, 1810. ' I enclose a memorandum, by which you will see the manner in which I have divided into districts the country which has been fortified between the Tagus and the sea ; the objects for which this division has been made; and that you are appointed regulating officer of the district No. —. ' I likewise enclose a list of the redoubts and works in that district; stating the number...
Page 96 - ... the slope. In such situations, the eye will frequently attain an object which the gun on its lower level will not. PALISADES. — The palisades in the ditches were mostly young fir-trees from 4 to 5 inches in diameter, roughly pointed, and fixed 3 or 4 feet into the ground, with a riband very low down, and, when the ditches were broad, much nearer the counterscarp than the scarp. In the last campaign...
Page 130 - No. is to arrange the troops in their several stations when they will be sent into the district to occupy the redoubts, to take charge of the mines intended to blow up the roads and bridges, and to carry my orders in the district into execution till an officer to command the troops within it will be appointed. You are then to assist him in making his arrangements as one of his staff, and in the defence of his post, with your professional abilities. " (Signed) WELLINGTON. "Captain , Royal Engineers.
Page 176 - I am happy to have it in my power to Say that my worthy friend Cap! Lewis is recovering fast, he walked a little to day for the first time, I have discontinued the tent in the hole the ball came out...

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