The Animal Kingdom Arranged in Conformity with Its Organization, Volume 3 (Google eBook)

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G. & C. & H. Carvill, 1831 - Zoology - 20 pages
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Page 399 - The mentum is usually large, covers the labrum, or is incorporated with it, and bears the palpi. The mandibles of several are membranous, a character observed in no other Coleopterous insects. The males frequently differ from the females, either by prominences on the thorax or head in the form of horns or tubercles, or by the largeness of their mandibles. This family is very numerous ; and is one of the most beautiful of the order for size of body, and the variety of forms exhibited in the head and...
Page 214 - ... old dry cheese, and upon putrid animal matters. Others subsist as parasites upon the skin, and in the flesh of different animals, often greatly weakening them by their excessive multiplication. The...
Page 204 - inhabit the hot countries of both hemispheres, live on the ground, conceal themselves under stones and other bodies, most commonly in ruins, dark and cool places, and even in houses. They run with considerable swiftness, curving the tail over the back— this they can turn in every direction, and use for the purposes of attack and defence. With their forceps they seize various insects, on which they feed after having pierced them with their sting. They are particularly fond of the eggs of spiders...
Page 164 - Their frontal chelicerae, or forceps-antennae, or mandibles, — for all these names are applied to the same things, — are terminated by a movable hook, flexed inferiorly, underneath which, and near its pointed extremity, is a little opening for the passage of a venomous fluid contained in a gland of the preceding joint. Their jaws are never more than two, and the abdomen is always furnished with from four to six closely approximated cylindrical or conical jointed...
Page 399 - These antennae are always short, usually consisting of nine or ten joints, and always terminated in a club usually composed of the three last, which are lamellar; sometimes flabelliform, or disposed like the leaves of a book, opening and closing in a similar way ; sometimes concentrically contorted and fitting into each other, the first or inferior then being semi-infundibuliform and receiving the others ; and sometimes arranged perpendicular to the axis, and forming a sort of comb. The body is generally...
Page 90 - The feet are short, hidden under the body, and hooked. The six last segments are furnished with lateral, fleshy, elongated, fasciculated appendages, which are simple in the males, but in the form of oars in the other sex. At the posterior extremity of the body are six other appendages, which are simple and curved, two of them being longer than the others. The abdominal valves are very large, cover all the lower part of the body, and form a...
Page 243 - ORTHOPTERA(2), there are six legs; four wings, the two superior in the form of cases, and mandibles and jaws for mastication, covered at the extremity by a galea; the inferior wings are folded in. two directions, or simply in their length, and the inner margins of the cases, usually coriaceous, are crossed. They only experience a semi- metamorphosis. In the seventh or the...
Page 97 - The body, which is most frequently filiform or linear, is composed (reckoning the head) of from eight to nine joints, with some small appendages, in form of tubercles, at its posterior and inferior extremity. The feet are terminated by a strong hook. The four anterior feet, of which the second are the greatest, are always terminated by a monodactylous claw. In many the four succeeding feet are shortened, less articulated, without any hook at the end, or rudimentary, and not at all fit for ordinary...
Page 203 - Cfesar. long slender tail formed of six joints, the last of which terminates in an arcuated and very acute sting, which effuses a venomous liquid.
Page 205 - Evropmti), is not usually dangerous ; but according to the experiments of Dr. Maccary, made upon himself, the sting of some other and larger species produces serious and alarming symptoms, and the older the animal the more active seems to be the poison. The remedy employed is the volatile alkali, used externally and internally. The young scorpions are produced at various intervals, and are carried by the parent for several days upon her back, during which time she never leaves her retreat.

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