The Miner's Friend: Or, an Engine to Raise Water by Fire... (Google eBook)

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S. Crouch, 1827 - 53 pages
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Page 19 - P p, without the least alteration of the stream ; only sometimes the stream of water will be somewhat stronger than before, if you pull the handle of the regulator before any considerable quantity of steam be gone up the clack R : but it is much better to let none of the steam go off (for that is but losing so much strength, and is easily prevented by pulling the regulator some little time before the vessel forcing is quite emptied). This being done, immediately turn the cock or pipe Y of the cistern...
Page 17 - L, the great boiler, two-thirds full of water, and D, the small boiler, quite full. Then screw in the said pipes again as fast and as tight as possible.
Page 19 - ... water-cock and tending the fire being no more than what a boy's strength can perform for a day together, and is as easily learned as their driving of a horse in a tub-gin; yet, after all, I would have men, and those, too, the most apprehensive, employed in working the engine, supposing them more careful than boys.
Page 20 - B, and the water of which boils, and in a very little time it gains more strength than the great boiler; for the force of the great boiler being perpetually spending and going out, and the other winding up, or increasing, it is not long before the force in D exceeds that in L ; so that the water in D, being depressed by its own steam or vapour, must necessarily rise through the pipe H...
Page 18 - In the meantime, the vessel Pjp being emptied of its air, turn the handle of the regulator from you again, and the force is upon the surface of the water in P, which surface being only heated by the steam, it does not condense it, but the steam gravitates or presses with an elastic quality like air, still...
Page 27 - I believe it may be made very useful to ships, but I dare not meddle with that matter; and leave it to the judgment of those who are the best judges of maritime affairs;" and he further remarks, " As for fixing the Engines in Ships, when they 1698.
Page 18 - ... will be immediately discharged when once gotten to the top, which takes up some time to recover that power ; which having once got, and being in work, it is easy for any one that never saw the engine, after half an hour's experience, to keep a constant stream running out the full bore of the pipe. On the outside of the vessel, you may see how the water goes out as well as if the vessel were transparent ; for as far as the steam continues within the vessel, so far is the vessel dry without, and...
Page 17 - The first thing is, to fix the engine in a good double furnace, so contrived that the flame of your fire may circulate round, and encompass your boilers, as you do coppers for brewing.
Page 50 - ... a man, and the men obliged to rest at least a third part of that time. I dare undertake that the engine shall raise you as much water for eightpence as will cost you a shilling to raise the like with your old engines, in coal pits, which is thirty-three pounds six shillings and eight-pence saved out of every hundred pounds; a brave estate gained in one year out of such great works ! where .3000, ,6000, or it may be 8000 per annum is expended for clearing their mines of water only, besides...
Page 18 - ... into p, pushing out all the air before it, through the clack r, making a noise. as it goes ; and when all is gone out, the bottom of the vessel p will be very hot. Then pull the handle of the regulator to you, by which means you stop...

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