Rome in Africa

Front Cover
Routledge, 1993 - History - 254 pages
1 Review
Nearly three thousand years ago, the Phoenicians set up trading colonies on the coast of North Africa, and ever since successive civilizations, largely from outside, have dominated the local inhabitants. Carthaginians, Romans, Vandals, Byzantines, Arabs, Turks, French and Italians have all occupied the region in their time.

The Romans governed this part of Africa for 600 years. Throughout the region their genius for building was readily apparent. There were about 600 cities, 12,000 miles of roads and hundreds of aquaducts--some fifty miles long. The remains of many of these structures can be seen today.

At the height of its prosperity, during the second and third centuries A.D., the area was the granary of Rome, and produced more olive oil than Italy itself.

The broadening horizons of the Roman Empire allowed a number of Africa's sons to prove their particular talents. The writers Terence and Apuleius, the first African Roman Emperor Septimius Severus, and famous Christian theologians like Tertullian and Saint Augustine are just some who rose to meet the challenges of their age.

Susan Raven recounts the story of this magnificent empire in North Africa, drawing on a wide variety of literary and archaeological evidence in addition to her own experience of the region, and revivifies the ghosts of the crumbling remains.

Attractively and comprehensively illustrated, this book will prove invaluable to students of the Roman provinces and Roman history in general.

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