The Gentleman's Magazine, Volumes 156-157 (Google eBook)

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F. Jeffries, 1834 - Early English newspapers
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The "Gentleman's magazine" section is a digest of selections from the weekly press; the "(Trader's) monthly intelligencer" section consists of news (foreign and domestic), vital statistics, a register of the month's new publications, and a calendar of forthcoming trade fairs.
  

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Page 467 - Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon; and thou, Moon, in the valley of Ajalon.
Page 304 - An Act for the Amendment and better Administration of the Laws relating to the Poor in England and Wales...
Page 265 - And Joseph commanded his servants the physicians to embalm his father : and the physicians embalmed Israel. And forty days were fulfilled for him ; for so are fulfilled the days of those which are embalmed : and the Egyptians mourned for him threescore and ten days.
Page 132 - A Perfect Copy of all Summons of the Nobility to the great Councils and Parliaments of this Realm, from the 49th of King Henry III. until these present Times, SK.
Page 608 - What little suppers, or sizings, as they were called, have I enjoyed ; when jEschylus, and Plato, and Thucydides were pushed aside, with a pile of lexicons, &c. to discuss the pamphlets of the day. Ever and anon, a pamphlet issued from the pen of Burke. There was no need of having the book before us. Coleridge had read it in the morning, and in the evening he would repeat whole pages verbatim.
Page 467 - So the sun stood still in the midst of heaven, and hasted not to go down about a whole day. And there was no day like that before it or after it, that the Lord hearkened unto the voice of a man : for the Lord fought for Israel.
Page 468 - Thy sun shall no more go down, neither shall thy moon withdraw itself: for the Lord shall be thine everlasting light, and the days of thy mourning shall be ended.
Page 82 - For when the breath of man goeth forth, he shall turn again to his earth, and then all his thoughts perish.
Page 342 - My father, my husband, and myself, sat down to a frugal neat supper, in a silence uninterrupted, except by exclamations of gladness from Mr Siddons. My father enjoyed his refreshments ; but occasionally stopped short, and, laying down his knife and fork, lifting up his venerable face, and throwing back his silver hair, gave way to tears of happiness.
Page 52 - He that spareth the rod hateth his son ; but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes.

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