Analytical Review: Or History of Literature, Domestic and Foreign, on an Enlarged Plan, Volume 28 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
J. Johnson., 1799
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Containing scientific abstracts of important and interesting works, published in English; a general account of such as are of less consequence, with short characters, notices, or reviews of valuable foreign books; criticisms on new pieces of music and works of art; and the literary intelligence of Europe, etc.
  

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Page 583 - Sad case it was, as you may think, For very cold to go to bed, And then for cold not sleep a wink.
Page 584 - He went complaining all the morrow That he was cold and very chill: His face was gloom, his heart was sorrow, Alas! that day for Harry Gill! That day he wore a...
Page 273 - Wouldst softly speak and stroke my head and smile Could those few pleasant days again appear, Might one wish bring them, would I wish them here? I would not trust my heart : the dear delight Seems so to be desired, perhaps I might.
Page 273 - Thy constant flow of love, that knew no fall, Ne'er roughen'd by those cataracts and breaks, That humour interposed too often makes ; All this still legible in memory's page, And still to be so to my latest age, Adds joy to duty, makes me glad to pay Such honours to thee as my numbers may ; Perhaps a frail memorial, but sincere, Not scorn'd in heaven, though little noticed here.
Page 439 - THE angel ended, and in Adam's ear So charming left his voice, that he awhile Thought him still speaking, still stood fix'd to hear...
Page 419 - The winds roared, and the rains fell. The poor white man, faint and weary, came and sat under our tree. He has no mother to bring him milk; no wife to grind his corn.
Page 582 - OH ! what's the matter what's the matter * What is't that ails young Harry Gill ? That evermore his teeth they chatter, Chatter, chatter, chatter still...
Page 272 - Children not thine have trod my nurs'ry floor; And where the gard'ner Robin, day by day, Drew me to school along the public way, Delighted with my bauble coach, and wrapt In scarlet mantle warm, and velvet capt, 'Tis now become a history little known, That once we call'd the past'ral house our own.
Page 189 - With that, methought, a legion of foul fiends Environ'd me, and howled in mine ears Such hideous cries, that, with the very noise, I trembling wak'd, and, for a season after, Could not believe but that I was in hell, Such terrible impression made my dream.
Page 584 - God ! who art never out of hearing, O may he never more be warm !" The cold, cold moon above her head, Thus on her knees did Goody pray, Young Harry heard what she had said : And icy cold he turned away.

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