Railroad Engineering

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John Wiley & Sons, Jun 16, 1982 - Business & Economics - 758 pages
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A revision of the classic text on railroad engineering, considered the ``bible'' of the field for three decades. Presents railroad engineering principles quantitatively but without excessive resort to mathematics, and applies these principles to day-by-day design, construction, operation, and maintenance. Relates practice to principles in an orderly, sequential pattern (subgrade, ballast, ties, rails). Applicable to both conventional railroads and rapid transit systems.
  

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Contents

The Nature of Railroad Traffic
14
Revenues and Costs
27
The Location Process
50
Effects of Distance
59
Propulsive Resistance
69
Motive Power
90
Motor types
119
Grade and Curve Resistance
140
Subgrade Construction Costs
324
Subgrade Stability Problems
333
Drainage
364
Ballast
393
Cross Ties
436
Concrete and Other Artificial Ties
469
Rail
484
Fastenings and Other Track Material
562

Acceleration and Deceleration
156
Velocity Profiles
179
Problems in Grades
192
Tonnage Ratings
207
Location Procedure
216
PRINCIPLES OF MAINTENANCE
237
Subgrade Materials
276
Subgrade Design and Construction
293
Track Geometry
593
Turnouts and Crossings
621
TrackTrain Dynamics
655
Conduct of Work
675
Railroad Right of Way
714
APPENDIX A LOCATION PROBLEM EXAMPLE
729
Name Index
741
Copyright

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About the author (1982)

About the author William W. Hay is Professor Emeritus of Railway Civil Engineering at the University of Illinois and is a domestic and foreign railroad consultant. Prior to his academic career, he spent 16 years in the engineering and maintenance departments of several major railroads and the military railway service. Dr. Hay is author of Introduction to Transportation Engineering, Second Edition (Wiley 1977) He is an honorary member of the American Railway Engineering Associations, and served as Director of both the Roadmasters and Maintenance of Way Associations of America. He received his Ph.D. in civil engineering from the University of Illinois.