The Medieval Warm Period

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Malcolm K. Hughes, Henry F. Diaz
Springer, Jan 1, 1994 - Nature - 342 pages
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The Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age are widely considered to have been the major features of the Earth's climate over the past 1000 years. In this volume the issue of whether there really was a Medieval Warm Period, and if so, where and when, is addressed. The types of evidence examined include historical documents, tree rings, ice cores, glacial-geological records, borehole temperature, paleoecological data and records of solar receipts inferred from cosmogenic isotopes. Growth in the availability of several of these types of data in recent years, and technical advances in their derivation and use, warrant this state-of-the-art re-examination of Medieval Warm Period.
The book will be of value to all those with an interest in the natural variability of the climate system, for example those concerned with anticipating and detecting anthropogenic climate change.
  

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Contents

I
109
II
143
III
171
IV
183
V
199
VI
213
VII
225
VIII
243
IX
271
X
289
XI
299
XII
309
XIII
317
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References from web pages

NOAA Paleoclimatology Global Warming - The Data
The "Medieval Warm Period". End. Medieval Warm Period - 9th to 14th Centuries. Norse seafaring and colonization around the North Atlantic at the end of the ...
www.ncdc.noaa.gov/ paleo/ globalwarming/ medieval.html

Medieval Warm Period - tripatlas.Com
The Medieval Warm Period (MWP) or Medieval Climate Optimum was a time of unusually warm climate in the North Atlantic region, lasting from about the tenth ...
tripatlas.com/ Medieval_climate_optimum

Orbital history and seasonality of regional precipitation
isotopic records of solar activity during the Medieval Warm Period. In Hughes, mk,. and Diaz, hf (eds.),. The Medieval Warm Period ...
www.springerlink.com/ index/ M3TRK1242428168M.pdf

About the author (1994)

Dr Henry F. Diaz is a Research Meteorologist in the Earth System Research Laboratory at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). He has worked on a variety of climate issues at NOAA over the last 15 years, particularly the impact of climatic variation on water resources of the western United States. He is recognized as an expert on the El Ni o Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon and coedited El Ni o: Historical and Paleoclimatic Aspects of the Southern Oscillation, also published by Cambridge University Press (1992).

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