Sensibility and English Song: Critical Studies of the Early Twentieth Century

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 27, 1989 - History - 640 pages
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This highly acclaimed study of English song is the first detailed account of an unusually fruitful interrelationship between English music and English poetry. The period covered is known as the English Musical Renaissance and runs from the last years of the nineteenth century to the Second World War. Stephen Banfield traces the late flowering of Romantic impulses in solo song during these years, surveying it from critical, analytical and historical angles. He plots the growth of the English stylistic sensibility in song in the decades leading up to the First World War, discusses in detail the plateau it reached between the wars (particularly in the 1920s), and shows how and why it declined as other musical concerns took the field. Poets whose verse was set to music most frequently, including Housman, Hardy, de la Mare and Yeats, are treated at length, as are pre-eminent song composers such as Butterworth, Finzi, Gurney, Ireland, Quilter, Somervell, Stanford, Vaughan Williams and Warlock. In all, more than fifty composers are discussed, and numerous individual songs. In the final section of the book, besides providing an extensive bibliography, Dr Banfield catalogues over 5,000 songs, giving dates of composition and publication and much other detail, listed by composer. This comprehensive survey will prove an invaluable reference guide to all students of the subject.
  

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The best available book on this much loved period in music history. Authoritative and suggestive, Banfield combines genuine insight with calculated appreciation. I highly recommended this book for anyone interested in the development of 20th century English song.

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Contents

The condition of English song in 1900
1
Reticent Victorians Elgar Parry Stanford and Wood
15
Narrative songcycle and dramatic scena Somervell and Walford Davies
42
Three postVictorians Hurlstone Bridge and Vaughan Williams
65
The Edwardian age I
88
The Edwardian age II
106
The first world war its effect and its victims
133
The lyrical impulse between the wars
157
Henry Walford Davies
437
Frederick Delius
438
Bernard van Dieren
439
Edward Elgar
440
Ernest Farrar
443
Gerald Finzi
444
John Foulds
447
Henry Balfour Gardiner
449

Introduction the uses of technique style and personal symbolism in John Ireland
159
The music of Ivor Gurney
179
Georgian poetry and Georgian music
208
Housman and the composers documentation and evaluation
233
The Celtic twilight
248
Time and destiny the Hardy songs of Gerald Finzi
275
The uses and abuses of technique
301
the pursuit of detachment
319
Rethinking the accompaniment
324
the later Vaughan Williams Rubbra and Hoist
328
the later Bridge Goossens and others
340
Escape into Warlock
356
Bliss Walton Berners and the breaking of the image
365
Britten and his period
382
The story of The Joyce Book
397
C W Orr on Housman settings
399
On Interpreting Housman
400
Song Lists
407
Arnold Bax
415
Lennox Berkeley
419
Gerald Berners
420
Arthur Bliss
421
Rutland Boughton
423
Havergal Brian
425
Frank Bridge
426
Benjamin Britten
428
William Denis Browne
430
Benjamin Burrows
431
Alan Bush
433
Samuel ColeridgeTaylor
434
Eugene Goossens
453
Percy Grainger
454
Ivor Gurney
456
Patrick Hadley
462
Fritz Hart
463
Michael Head
474
Joseph Holbrooke
476
Gustav Holst
479
Herbert Howells
481
William Hurlstone
483
John Ireland
484
Frederick Lambert
487
Norman ONeill
489
Charles Wilfred Orr
491
Hubert Parry
492
Roger Quilter
496
Alan Rawsthorne
500
Edmund Rubbra
501
Cyril Scott
503
Francis George Scott
506
Arthur Somervell
510
Charles Villiers Stanford
513
John Sykes
517
Michael Tippett
519
William Walton
523
Peter Warlock
524
Charles Wood
528
Bibliography
531
Index
543
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