The Reconstructed Past: Reconstructions in the Public Interpretation of Archaeology and History

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John H. Jameson
Rowman Altamira, 2004 - Social Science - 307 pages
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To reconstruct or not to reconstruct? That is the question facing many agencies andsite managers throughout the world. The case studies in this volume contribute to the ongoing debates between data and material authenticity and educational and interpretive value of reconstructions.
  

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Contents

Walden Pond and Beyond The Restoration Archaeology of Roland Wells Robbins
21
Archaeological Authenticity and Reconstruction at Colonial Williamsburg
47
National Park Service Reconstruction Policy and Practice
65
Measuring Effectiveness for Interpretation and Site Management
75
Reconstruction Dilemmas at George Washingtons Blacksmith Shop
77
Reconstruction Policy and Purpose at Castell Henllys Iron Age Fort
91
Bedes World A LateTwentiethCentury Creation of an Early Medieval Landscape
103
Reflections on a Reconstruction of the Ancient Qasrin Synagogue and Village
127
Designing the Past at Fortress Louisbourg
199
Lessons Learned at Bents Old Fort and Fort Union Trading Post
215
Emergency Ruins Preservation and Restoration at Homolovi Ruins State Park
233
Virtual Reconstructions
247
Modeling Amarna Computer Reconstructions of an Egyptian Palace
249
Beyond the Artists Impression From PhotoRealism to Integrated Reconstruction in Buildings Archaeology
261
The Future of Reconstruction
271
The Value of Reconstructions An Archaeological Perspective
273

Replication or Interpretation of the Iroquoian Longhouse
147
Reconstruction Interpretation and Education at Fort Loudon
167
The Ironbridge Gorge Preservation Reconstruction and Presentation of Industrial Heritage
177
Index
287
About the Contributors
301
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

\John H. Jameson, Jr. is a senior archaeologist with the National Park Service's Southeast Archaeological Center in Tallahassee, Florida. A recognized leader in public archaeology, he is a key player in the development of training courses for park rangers and archaeologists in the effective interpretation of archaeological resources.

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