A Chaste Maid in Cheapside

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Nick Hern Books, 2007 - Drama - 104 pages
1 Review

Drama Classics: The World's Great Plays at a Great Little Price

A delightfully lewd city comedy written in 1613 by the co-author of The Changeling. Unpublished until 1630 and long-neglected afterwards, it is now considered among the best and most characteristic Jacobean comedies.

Edited and introduced by Emma French

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User Review  - mstrust - LibraryThing

Moll is the maid, or pretty young daughter, of Yellowhammer, a goldsmith. She has two men vying for her hand. One is the wealthy Knight, Sir Walter Whorehound, who already has two mistresses, one of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Roger_Scoppie - LibraryThing

Thomas Middleton (1580-1627) was an English Jacobean playwright and poet. Middleton stands with John Fletcher and Ben Jonson as among the most successful and prolific of playwrights who wrote their ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
19
Section 3
41
Section 4
63
Section 5
82
Section 6
103
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Thomas Middleton, 1580-1627 Middleton wrote in a wide variety of genres and styles, and was a thoroughly professional dramatist. His comedies were generally based on London life but seen through the perspective of Roman comedy, especially those of Plautus. Middleton is a masterful constructor of plots. "A Chaste Maid in Cheapside" (1630) is typical of Middleton's interests. It is biting and satirical in tone: the crassness of the willing cuckold Allwit is almost frightening. Middleton was very preoccupied with sexual themes, especially in his tragedies, "The Changeling" (1622), written with William Rowley, and "Women Beware Women" (1621). The portraits of women in these plays are remarkable. Both Beatrice-Joanna in "The Changeling" and Bianca in "Women Beware Women" move swiftly from innocence to corruption, and Livia in "Women Beware Women" is noteworthy as a feminine Machiavelli and manipulator. In his psychological realism and his powerful vision of evil, Middleton resembles Shakespeare.

Emma French is a visiting lecturer in theater studies at London Metropolitan University and is the reviews editor at" Theater Notebook,"

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