A Future for Archaeology: The Past in the Present

Front Cover
Psychology Press, 2006 - Archaeology - 251 pages
0 Reviews

Over the last thirty years issues of culture, identity and meaning have moved out of the academic sphere to become central to politics and society at all levels from the local to the global. Archaeology has been at the forefront of these moves towards a greater engagement with the non-academic world, often in an extremely practical and direct way, for example in the disputes about the repatriation of human burials.

Such disputes have been central to the recognition that previously marginalised groups have rights in their own past which are important for their future. The essays in this book look back at some of the most important events where a role for an archaeology concerned with the past in the present first emerged and look forward to the practical and theoretical issues now central to a socially engaged discipline and shaping its future.

This book is published in honour of Professor Peter Ucko, who has played an unparalleled role in promoting awareness of the core issues in this volume among archaeologists.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PETER UCKOS HUMANE ARCHAEOLOGY
7
REPOSITIONING ANTHROPOLOGY 19721980
31
MANAGEMENT
65
INDIGENOUS HUMAN REMAINS AND CHANGING MUSEUM
83
THE MAN WHO WOULD BE MOSES
97
THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF LOCAL MYTHS
127
PRACTISING ARCHAEOLOGY IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN
143
CENTRAL EUROPEAN ARCHAEOLOGY AT THE CROSSROADS
157
THEORETICAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES
173
THE IDEA OF PREHISTORY IN THE MIDDLE EAST
187
METHODS AND THEORIES
199
REFOCUSING ARCHAEOLOGY
217
THE MULTIDISCIPLINARY STUDY OF AGRICULTURAL
229
Index
245
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2006)

Robert Layton is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Durham. His previous books include Who Needs the Past? Indigenous values and archaeology, Conflict in the Archaeology of Living Traditions (edited; both Unwin 1989; Routledge 1994), An introduction to theory in anthropology (CUP 1997), Anthropology and history in Franche-Comt; a critique of social theory (OUP, 2000), and Order and anarchy: civil society, social disorder and war (CUP, in press). His research interests include indigenous rights and the evolution of social order.Stephen Shennan is Deputy Director of the Institute of Archaeology, UCL, and Director of the AHRC Centre for the Evolutionary Analysis of Cultural Behaviour. His previous books include The Evolution of Cultural Diversity: A Phylogenetic Approach (edited with Ruth Mace and Clare Holden; UCL Press 2005), Genes, Memes and Human History: Darwinian Archaeology and Cultural Evolution (Thames and Hudson 2002), Quantifying Archaeology (Edinburgh University Press 1997), and The Archaeology of Human Ancestry: Power, Sex and Tradition (edited with James Steele, Routledge 1996). His current interests focus on the application of ideas from evolutionary biology to the understanding of cultural and social change in the past.Peter Stone is Director of the International Centre for Cultural and Heritage Studies at the University of Newcastle and Honorary Chief Executive Officer of the World Archaeological Congress. He teaches heritage management, tourism, media, education and interpretation and has worked internationally as a consultant in these areas. His previous books include Education and the Historic Environment (co-edited with D. Henson and M. Corbishley, Routledge 2004), The Destruction and Conservation of The Cultural Heritage (co-edited with R Layton and J Thomas, Routledge 2001), and The Constructed Past: Experimental Archaeology, Tourism and Education (co-edited with P Planel, Routledge 1999). His current interests focus on the differing drivers for heritage protection and management and the implications these have for interpretation of the past.

Stephen Shennan is Director of the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.

Bibliographic information