A Trial of Witches: A Seventeenth-century Witchcraft Prosecution

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Psychology Press, 1997 - History - 284 pages
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In 1662, Amy Denny and Rose Cullender were accused of witchcraft, and, in one of the most important of such cases in England, stood trial and were hanged in Bury St Edmunds. A Trial of Witchesis a complete account of this sensational trial and an analysis of the court procedures, and the larger social, cultural and political concerns of the period.
In a critique of the official process, the book details how the erroneous conclusions of the trial were achieved. The authors consider the key participants in the case, including the judge and medical witness, their institutional importance, their part in the fate of the women and their future careers.
Through detailed research of primary sources, the authors explore the important implications of this case for the understanding of hysteria, group mentality, social forces and the witchcraft phenomenon as a whole.
 

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A trial of witches: a seventeenth-century witchcraft prosecution

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In 1662 Ann Denny and Rose Cullender were tried and hanged for witchcraft in the English market town of Bury St. Edmunds. Geis (criminology, emeritus, Univ. of California, Irvine) and English ... Read full review

Contents

Witchcrafts here resemble witchcrafts there
3
The toad in the blanket
21
The swouning sisters
55
Lice of extraordinary bigness
78
What might it mean?
107
Wrinkled face furrowed brow and gobber tooth
109
A man of bilious complexion and a with power
135
Of fear and drear
156
An age of so much knowledge confidence
172
Post mortem
193
A matter of adipocere
195
A tryal of witches
212
Notes
229
Index
277
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About the author (1997)

Geis-Prof Emeritus, Dept of Criminology, Law & Society, Univ of California, Irvine.

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