A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary: And Expositor of the English Language...

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Richardson, 1822 - 691 pages
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Page 174 - The Ember days at the four Seasons, being the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday after the first Sunday in Lent, the Feast of Pentecost, September 14, and December 13.
Page 70 - As emphasis evidently points out the most significant word in a sentence ; so, where other reasons do not forbid, the accent always dwells with greatest force on that part of the word which, from its importance, the hearer has always the greatest occasion to observe : and this is necessarily the root or body of the word.
Page 63 - But if this letter is too forcibly pronounced in Ireland, it is often too feebly sounded in England, and particularly in London, where it is sometimes entirely sunk...
Page v - ... always less remote from the orthography, and less " liable to. capricious innovation. They have, however, generally formed their tables according to " the cursory speech of those with whom they happened to converse, and, concluding that the " whole nation combines to vitiate language in one manner, have often established the jargon of the " lowest of the people as the model of speech.
Page 17 - I have endeavoured to correct some of the more glaring errors of my countrymen, who, with all their faults, are still upon the whole the best pronouncers of the English language : for though the pronunciation of London is certainly erroneous in many words, yet, upon being compared with that of any other place, it is undoubtedly the best; that is, not only the best by courtesy, and because it happens to be the pronunciation of the capital, but the best by a better title — that of being more generally...
Page viii - Is it the usage of the multitude of speakers, whether good or bad ? This has never been asserted by the most sanguine abettors of its authority. Is it the usage of the studious in schools and colleges, with those of the learned professions...
Page 12 - ... in which any particular man, or race of men, lived, as, the age of heroes; the space of a hundred years ; the latter part of life, old age : in...
Page 89 - A space upon the surface of the earth, measured from the equator to the polar circles ; in each of which spaces the longest day is half an hour longer than in that nearer to the equator.
Page 52 - The vulgar shorten this sound, and pronounce the o obscurely, and sometimes as if followed by r, as winder and feller, for window and fellow ; but this is almost too despicable for notice.
Page 341 - A strong vessel in which materials are broken by being pounded with a pestle ; a short wide cannon, out of which bombs are thrown.

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