Accelerated C# 2010

Front Cover
Apress, Jan 15, 2010 - Computers - 656 pages
3 Reviews

C# 2010 offers powerful new features, and this book is the fastest path to mastering them—and the rest of C#—for both experienced C# programmers moving to C# 2010 and programmers moving to C# from another object-oriented language. Many books introduce C#, but very few also explain how to use it optimally with the .NET Common Language Runtime (CLR). This book teaches both core C# language concepts and how to wisely employ C# idioms and object-oriented design patterns to exploit the power of C# and the CLR.

This book is both a rapid tutorial and a permanent reference. You'll quickly master C# syntax while learning how the CLR simplifies many programming tasks. You’ll also learn best practices that ensure your code will be efficient, reusable, and robust. Why spend months or years discovering the best ways to design and code C# when this book will show you how to do things the right way from the start?

Comprehensively and concisely explains both C# 2008 and C# 2010 features Focuses on the language itself and on how to use C# 2010 proficiently for all .NET application development Concentrates on how C# features work and how to best use them for robust, high-performance code What you’ll learn How C# works with and exploits the CLR How to use arrays, collections, and iterators How to handle events with delegates and anonymous functions How to design and use generic types and methods How to thread efficiently and robustly How C# anonymous types, lamba expressions, and extension methods work and how to use them Who this book is for

If you're an experienced C# programmer, you need to understand how C# has changed with C# 2010. If you're an experienced object-oriented programmer moving to C#, you want to ramp up quickly in the language while learning the latest features and techniques. In either case, this book is for you. The first three chapters succinctly present C# fundamentals, for those new to or reviewing C#. The rest of the book covers all the major C# features, in great detail, explaining how they work and how best to use them. Whatever your background or need, you’ll treasure this book for as long as you code in C# 2010.

Table of Contents C# Preview C# and the CLR C# Syntax Overview Classes, Structs, and Objects Interfaces and Contracts Overloading Operators Exception Handling and Exception Safety Working with Strings Arrays, Collection Types, and Iterators Delegates, Anonymous Functions, and Events Generics Threading in C# In Search of C# Canonical Forms Extension Methods Lambda Expressions LINQ: Language Integrated Query Dynamic Types

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C Preview
C and the CLR
C Syntax Overview
Classes Structs and Objects
Interfaces and Contracts
Overloading Operators
Exception Handling and Exception Safety
Working with Strings
Threading in C
In Search of C Canonical Forms
Extension Methods
Lambda Expressions
LINQ Language Integrated Query
Dynamic Types

Arrays Collection Types and Iterators
Delegates Anonymous Functions and Events

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About the author (2010)

Trey Nash is an escalation engineer at Microsoft working on the Windows operating systems as well as various other products. When he is not working feverishly within the bowels of the operating system, he is delivering training on .NET Platform debugging as well as user mode and kernel mode debugging on the Windows platform. Prior to working at Microsoft, he was a principal software engineer working on security solutions at Credant Technologies, a market-leading security software company. He also enjoined a stint at a large Bluetooth company developing Bluetooth solutions for the release of Microsoft Vista. Before that, he called Macromedia, Inc. home for five years. At Macromedia, he worked on a cross-product engineering team for several years, designing solutions for a wide range of products throughout the company, including Flash, Fireworks, and Dreamweaver. He specialized in COM/DCOM using C/C++/ATL until the .NET revolution. He's been glued to computers ever since he scored his first, a TI-99/4A, when he was a mere 13 years old. He astounded his parents by turning a childhood obsession into a decent-paying career, much to their dismay. Trey received his bachelor of science and his master of engineering degrees in electrical engineering from Texas A&M University. When he's not sitting in front of a computer, you can find him working in his garage, playing his piano, brushing up on a foreign language (Russian and Icelandic are the current favorites), or playing ice hockey.

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