Adaptive Governance and Climate Change

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jan 22, 2013 - Science - 424 pages
As greenhouse gas emissions and temperatures at the poles continue to rise, so do damages from extreme weather events affecting countless lives. Meanwhile, ambitious international efforts to cut emissions (Kyoto, Copenhagen) have proved to be politically ineffective or infeasible. There is hope, however, in adaptive governance—an approach that has succeeded in some local communities and can be undertaken by others around the globe. This book provides a political and historical analysis of climate change policy; shows how adaptive governance has worked on the ground in Barrow, Alaska, and other local communities; and makes the case for adaptive governance as a complementary approach in the climate change regime.
 

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This is another example of bad 'science'. As in there is none here. Instead it appears to be the ruminations of an atmospheric scientist who views social systems as a hobby and a policy analyst who has read too much Kaplan. This book will serve nothing more than to add to the cacophony of vaporous rhetoric that plagues any attempts to develop pragmatic steps toward adapting to climate change. 

Contents

1 CLARIFYING THE PROBLEM
1
2 THE REGIME EVOLVES
31
3 BARROW AS MICROCOSM
105
4 OPENING THE REGIME
187
5 REFRAMING THE CONTEXT
261
NOTES
317
INDEX
397
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About the author (2013)

Ronald D. Brunner is a policy scientist specializing in the integration of theory and practice. Amanda H. Lynch is head of Monash Climate and a professor in the School of Geography and Environmental Sciences at Monash University.

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