Ain't I a Feminist?: African American Men Speak Out on Fatherhood, Friendship, Forgiveness, and Freedom

Front Cover
Ain’t I a Feminist? presents the life stories of twenty African American men who identify themselves as feminists, centering on the turning points in their lives that shaped and strengthened their commitment to feminism, as well as the ways they practice feminism with women, children, and other men. In her analysis, Aaronette M. White highlights feminist fathering practices; how men establish egalitarian relationships with women; the variety of Black masculinities; and the interplay of race, gender, class, and sexuality politics in American society. Coming from a wide range of family backgrounds, ages, geographical locations, sexualities, and occupations, each man also shares what he experiences as the personal benefits of feminism, and how feminism contributes to his efforts towards social change. Focusing on the creative agency of Black men to redefine the assumptions and practices of manhood, the author also offers recommendations regarding the socialization of African American boys and the reeducation of African American men in the interest of strengthening their communities.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I helped Dr. White do the initial research on this project and it was absolutely amazing!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Definitely worth the study, read and journey!!!

Contents

Framing the Issues
1
The Sons of Sojourner Truth
12
Challenging Assumptions About Power
31
The Need and Willingness to Change
61
5 Romantic Relationships with Feminist Women
84
6 Platonic Friendships with Feminist Women
111
7 Men as Friends Brothersand Lovers
134
Nurturing Interactions with Children
156
Can Black Men Really Be Feminists?
192
Methodological Intersections and Considerations
202
Interview Categories
209
Historical and Contemporary Usage of the Terms Feministand Womanist
211
NOTES
213
REFERENCES
233
INDEX
258
Copyright

9 Private CommitmentsPublic Actions
175

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author

Aaronette M. White is Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of California at Santa Cruz.

Bibliographic information