All Things in Common: The Economic Practices of the Early Christians

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Wipf and Stock Publishers, Apr 25, 2017 - Religion - 146 pages
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All Things in Common gets behind the "communism of the apostles" passages in Acts 2:42-47 and 4:32-37, using the anthropological categories of "social relationship" espoused by David Graeber and other anthropologists. Looking at sources ranging from the Qumran scrolls to the North African apologist Tertullian to the Roman satirist Lucian, All Things in Common reconstructs the economic practices of the early Christians and argues that what is described in Acts 2:42-47 and 4:32-37 is a long-term, widespread set of practices that were taken seriously by the early Christians, and that differentiated them significantly from the wider world. This book takes into account Judean and Hellenistic parallels to the early Christian community of goods, as well as the socioeconomic context from which it came, and traces its origins back to the very teachings of Jesus and his declaration of the Jubilee.
This book will be of interest to anyone interested in Christian history, and especially the socioeconomic aspects of early Christianity, as well as anyone interested in Christian ethics and New Testament studies. It would also be of interest to anyone interested in possible alternatives to the ideology of capitalism.
 

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Contents

introduction
1
Economic Relationships
15
The Essenes a Jewish messianic Community
27
4
38
The Economic Practices of the Early Christians
48
The Tragedy of the Commons
70
The View from the outside
76
The Theological origins of Christian sharing
83
A Universal Community
104
Why others get it Wrong
110
Conclusion
118
Bibliography
125
Copyright

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About the author (2017)

Roman A. Montero spends a lot of time studying early Christianity, Koine Greek, early Christian texts, and the historical context of second temple Judaism; All Things in Common is a result of a few years of doing that.

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