An Historical Review of the State of Ireland: From the Invasion of that Country Under Henry II. to Its Union with Great Britain on the First of January 1801 ...

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William F. McLaughlin and Bartholomew Graves, 1806 - Ireland
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Page 68 - Assembly; be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, that it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty, his heirs and successors, by...
Page 47 - My lords, you are impatient for the sacrifice. The blood which you seek is not congealed by the artificial terrors which surround your victim ; it circulates warmly and unruffled, through the channels which God created for noble purposes, but which you are bent to destroy, for purposes so grievous that they cry to heaven.
Page 46 - ... my memory by believing that I could have engaged in any cause but that of my country's liberty and independence ; or that I could have become the pliant minion of power, in the oppression or the miseries of my countrymen.
Page 25 - Ireland shall, upon the first day of January which shall be in the year of our Lord, one thousand eight hundred and one, and for ever after, be united into one kingdom, by the name of The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland...
Page 71 - Britain may hereafter enjoy the same except the Right and Privilege of sitting in the House of Lords and the Privileges depending thereon and particularly the Right of sitting upon the Trials of Peers.
Page 88 - Ireland in the house of commons of the parliament of the united kingdom: That such act as shall be passed in the parliament of Ireland previous to the union, to regulate the mode by which the lords spiritual and temporal, and the commons, to serve in the parliament of the united kingdom on the part of Ireland, shall be summoned and returned to the said parliament...
Page 45 - I would dispute every inch of ground, burn every blade of grass, and the last entrenchment of liberty should be my grave. What I could not do myself, if I should fall, I should leave as a last charge to my countrymen to accomplish; because I should feel conscious that life, any more than death, is unprofitable when a foreign nation holds my country in subjection. But it was not as an enemy that the succours of France were to land.
Page 44 - This, no doubt, may be dispensed with, and so might the whole ceremony of the trial, since sentence was already pronounced at the Castle before your jury was empanelled. Your Lordships are but the priests of the oracle, and I submit — but I insist on the whole of the forms.
Page 36 - How then shall they call on him in whom they have not believed? and how shall they believe in him of whom they have not heard? and how shall they hear without a preacher? and how shall they preach, except they be sent? as it is written, How beautiful are the feet of them that preach the gospel of peace, and bring glad tidings of good things!
Page 69 - Heirs or Successors shall declare her or their Pleasure for holding the First or any subsequent Parliament of Great Britain until the Parliament of Great Britain shall make further provision therein a Writ do issue under the Great Seal of the United Kingdom...

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