An Inquiry Into the Human Mind: On the Principles of Common Sense

Front Cover
T. Cadell in the Strand, London; and J. Bell and W. Creech, Edinburgh, 1785 - Philosophy - 488 pages
 

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Contents

I
xi
IV
xv
V
6
VII
12
IX
15
XI
19
XIII
22
XIV
24
LI
108
LIII
121
LV
130
LVII
134
LIX
142
LXI
149
LXIII
155
LXIV
162

XVI
27
XIX
34
XX
28
XXII
33
XXIII
34
XXV
40
XXVII
49
XXIX
55
XXXI
57
XXXIII
65
XXXVI
69
XXXVII
72
XL
75
XLI
83
XLV
84
XLVI
88
XLVII
94
XLIX
97
L
103
LXVI
173
LXVII
180
LXIX
192
LXXI
213
LXXII
219
LXXIV
231
LXXV
260
LXXVI
274
LXXVIII
279
LXXX
299
LXXXI
306
LXXXIII
319
LXXXV
325
LXXXVII
332
LXXXVIII
348
LXXXIX
357
XCI
377
XCIII
383
XCV
402

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Page 4 - Could we obtain a distinct and full history of all that hath passed in the mind of a child from the beginning of life and sensation, till it grows up to the use of reason ; how its infant faculties began to work, and how they brought forth and ripened all the various notions, opinions, and sentiments, which we find in ourselves when we come to be capable of reflection : this would be a treasure of natural history, which...
Page 158 - I have here supposed that my reader is acquainted with that great modern discovery, which is at present universally acknowledged by all the inquirers into natural philosophy: namely, that light and colours, as apprehended by the imagination, are only ideas in the mind, and not qualities that have any existence in matter.
Page i - That nothing is perceived but what is in the mind which perceives it : That we do not really perceive things that are external, but only certain images and pictures of them imprinted upon the mind, which are called impressions and ideas.
Page 317 - And now being lately couched of his other eye, he says, that objects at first appeared large to this eye, but not so large as they did at first to the other ; and looking upon the same object with both eyes, he thought it looked about twice as large as with the first couched eye only, but not double that we can any way discover.
Page 5 - The labyrinth may be too intricate, and the thread too fine, to be traced through all its windings; but, if we stop where we can trace it no farther, and secure the ground we have gained, there is no harm done; a quicker eye may in time trace it farther.
Page 5 - ... be given but the will of our Maker. This may be truly called an analysis of the human faculties, and till this is performed, it is in vain we expect any just system of the mind, that is, an enumeration of the original powers and laws of our constitution, and an explication from them of the various phenomena of human nature.
Page 331 - ... nerves meet before they come into the brain, the fibres on the right side of both nerves uniting there, and after union going thence into the brain in the nerve which is on the right side of the head, and the fibres on the left side of both nerves uniting in the same place, and after union going into the brain in the nerve which is on the left side of the head, and these two nerves meeting in the brain in...
Page 431 - When I perceive a tree before me, my faculty of seeing gives me not only a notion or simple apprehension of the tree, but a belief of its existence, and of its figure, distance, and magnitude; and this judgment or belief is not got by comparing ideas, it is included in the very nature of the perception.
Page 4 - ... sensation, till it grows up to the use of reason; how its infant faculties began to work, and how they brought forth and ripened all the various notions, opinions, and sentiments, which we find in ourselves when we come to be capable of reflection, this would be a treasure of natural history, which would probably give more light into the human faculties, than all the systems of philosophers about them since the beginning of the world.
Page 30 - When I attend as carefully as I can to what passes in my mind in this case, it appears evident that the very thing I saw yesterday, and the fragrance I smelled, are now the immediate objects of my mind, when I remember it.

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