Animal Liberation

Front Cover
Avon Books, 1990 - Animal rights - 320 pages
7 Reviews
The Book That Started A RevolutionSince its original publication in 1975, this groundbreaking work has awakened millions of concerned men and women to the shocking abuse of animals everywhere -- inspiring a worldwide movement to eliminate much of the cruel and unnecessary laboratory animal experimentation of years past. In this newly revised and expanded edition, author Peter Singer exposes the chilling realities of today's "factory forms" and product-testing procedures -- offering sound, humane solutions to what has become a profound environmental and social as well as moral issue. An important and persuasive appeal to conscience, fairness, decency and justice, Animal Liberation is essential reading for the supporter and the skeptic alike.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JorgeCarvajal - LibraryThing

In the first half of the book, Singer opens our eyes in regards to how we treat the staggering majority of animals today. In the the second half, he shows us the way to a more ethical life. All with overwhelming evidence, using reason, logic, and unbiased scientific reference. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Sullywriter - LibraryThing

I read this book for some background research. A philosopher with a specialty in ethics, Singer discusses "specieism" (prejudice toward non-human animals) and offers vivid accounts of its most ... Read full review

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About the author (1990)

Born in Australia, Singer received his B.A. and M.A. from the University of Melbourne and, in 1971, his B. Phil from University College, Oxford. During his teaching career, he has held positions in philosophy in England, the United States, and Australia. While a student at Oxford, Singer was deeply affected by a group of people who had become vegetarians for ethical reasons. Joining their commitment to the rights of animals, he wrote Animal Liberation: A New Ethics for Our Treatment of Animals (1975), a persuasively reasoned, yet clearly understandable defense of the rights of animals. Singer's vocal concern for the proper treatment of animals has triggered a new appreciation of the anthropocentric bias of traditional Western moral philosophy; other philosophers have followed his lead. Complaining that ethical theorists have focused too intensely upon the rights, responsibilities, and treatment of humans, Singer dubs this malady "speciesism" and calls for a broader moral perspective---one that includes a sensitivity to the needs and concerns of other sentient creatures.

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