Baudrillard and Theology

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A&C Black, Jul 5, 2012 - Philosophy - 192 pages
Jean Baudrillard was one of the foremost intellectual figures of the late twentieth century and his work is currently reaching a new prominence in the English-speaking world. Known as the “high priest of postmodernity”, Baudrillard never directly addressed theological concerns. However, his provocative analysis of the changing nature of reality, subjectivity and agency is of increasing importance to contemporary theology. Furthermore, his mode of cultural analysis (which he himself describes as “mystical”) provides fruitful possibilities for theological reasoning in the post-idealist world he describes.
James Walters provides the context of Baudrillard's writing and identifies key influences. He then sets out his core ideas, drawing in theological responses and relating them to theological concerns. Finally, he highlights some areas of his work of particular theological interest.
 

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Contents

Overcoming the real
1
PART ONE
9
Signs systems and 68
11
Simulation and the hyperreal
26
Exchange Economic and symbolic
41
Life after God
55
Part TWO
65
Sacraments and simulacra
67
Beyond good and evil
94
Barred bodies
106
Fragments in the desert
119
Radical otherness
132
Notes
145
Bibliography
170
Index
177
Copyright

Eschatology terrorism and death
80

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About the author (2012)

James Walters has completed a PhD at the University of Cambridge (UK) and currently serves as an Anglican priest in the Diocese of London, UK.

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