Bazaar and State in Iran: The Politics of the Tehran Marketplace

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Cambridge University Press, Apr 12, 2007 - Political Science
The Tehran Bazaar has always been central to the Iranian economy and indeed, to the Iranian urban experience. Arang Keshavarzian's fascinating book compares the economics and politics of the marketplace under the Pahlavis, who sought to undermine it in the drive for modernisation and under the subsequent revolutionary regime, which came to power with a mandate to preserve the bazaar as an 'Islamic' institution. The outcomes of their respective policies were completely at odds with their intentions. Despite the Shah's hostile approach, the bazaar flourished under his rule and maintained its organisational autonomy to such an extent that it played an integral role in the Islamic revolution. Conversely, the Islamic Republic implemented policies that unwittingly transformed the ways in which the bazaar operated, thus undermining its capacity for political mobilisation. Arang Keshavarizian's book affords unusual insights into the politics, economics and society of Iran across four decades.
 

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Contents

Spatial centralization and integration of the Bazaars networks
141
The Islamic Republic and the Tehran Bazaar
146
was a member of the Islamic Revolutionary Council immediately after
152
articulation of the new Islamic populist transformative project that was
157
Methods of incorporation
161
wholesalers in the Bazaar and the merchants themselves are now
180
Conclusions
185
commodity types
187

institutions and the Bazaars organization and its apparent solidarity
60
The Bazaar economy as a product of informational scarcity
62
The Tehran Bazaar as an embedded network
65
Conclusions
73
networks
74
The cooperative hierarchies of the prerevolutionary
77
integrated the members of the Bazaar into a corporate unit
85
Crosscutting and multiplex social relationships
91
Daughter 2
97
The coercive hierarchies of the postrevolutionary bazaar
100
Conclusions
125
4 Networks in the context of transformative
127
The replacing of traditional bazaars
132
steps and path to be taken a western developmental
134
Economic policies and the Bazaars autonomy
139
Relations in the postrevolutionary carpet bazaar
204
reduced the licenses and foreign exchange available to wouldbe
218
investigated group size geographical dispersion of the value chains
221
6
228
The existing bazaari networks were an important factor in creating
234
nor dominated the Bazaar in terms of numbers or dictated
248
Conclusions
268
7 Conclusions
270
4 Networks in the context of transformative
127
The replacing of traditional bazaars
132
steps and path to be taken a western developmental
134
Economic policies and the Bazaars autonomy
139
Spatial centralization and integration of the Bazaars networks
141
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Page 27 - Theda Skocpol, Protecting Soldiers and Mothers: The Political Origins of Social Policy in the United States (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992).
Page 26 - Douglass C. North, Institutions, Institutional Change and Economic Performance (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990). 29. For this, see Charles Tilly, Coercion, Capital, and European States (Cambridge and Oxford: Blackwell, 1992); "War Making and State Making as Organized Crime...

About the author (2007)

Arang Keshavarzian is Assistant Professor in Political Science at Concordia University, Montral.

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