Bringing the Passions Back In: The Emotions in Political Philosophy

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Rebecca Kingston, Leonard Ferry
UBC Press, May 20, 2008 - Political Science - 272 pages

The rationalist ideal has been met with cynicism in progressive circles for undermining the role of emotion and passion in the public realm. By exploring the social and political implications of the emotions in the history of ideas, contributors examine new paradigms for liberalism and offer new appreciations of the potential for passion in political philosophy and practice. Bringing the Passions Back In draws upon the history of political theory to shed light on the place of emotions in politics; it illustrates how sophisticated thinking about the relationship between reason and passion can inform contemporary democratic political theory.

 

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Contents

The Emotions and the History of Political Thought
3
1 Explaining Emotions
19
2 Plato on Shame and Frank Speech in Democratic Athens
40
Phronesis Rhetoric and Aristotles Passionate Practical Deliberation
60
The Emotions in Aquinas Philosophical Psychology
78
5 The Political Relevance of the Emotions from Descartes to Smith
108
6 Passion Power and Impartiality in Hume
126
Rousseau on the Passions
145
8 Feelings in the Political Philosophy of JS Mill
155
9 Emotions Reasons and Judgments
172
10 The Politics of Emotion
189
Notes
209
Bibliography
243
Contributors
254
Index
256
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About the author (2008)

Rebecca Kingston is an associate professor of political science at the University of Toronto. Leonard Ferry is a doctoral candidate in political philosophy at the University of Toronto.

Contributors: Arash Abizadeh, Leah Bradshaw, Sharon Krause, Ingrid Makus, Amélie Oksenberg Rorty, Marlene K. Sokolon, Robert C. Solomon, Christina Tarnopolsky, and Charles Taylor

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