British Conservatism and Trade Unionism, 1945-1964

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Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2009 - History - 200 pages
For a brief period between the end of the Second World War and the election of Harold Wilson's Labour government in 1964, the Conservative Party made strenuous efforts to avoid confrontation with, or legislation against, the trade unions. This book explores the reasons behind this policy.
 

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Contents

Introduction I
1
Preparing a Voluntarist Approach 19451951
37
Voluntarism in Practice 19511960
63
In Defence of Free Collective Bargaining 19511960
93
Voluntarism under Strain 19601964
117
Towards Incomes Policies 19601964
149
Conclusion
167
Bibliography
187
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Peter Dorey is Reader in British Politics at Cardiff University. This is his ninth book on post-1945 British political history and public policy. Previous books include Wage Politics in Britain: The Rise and Fall of Incomes Policies since 1945 (2001), Policy Making in Britain: An Introduction (2005), The Labour Governments 1964-1970 (Editor, 2006) and The Labour Party and Constitutional Reform: A History of Constitutional Conservatism (2008). He is currently writing two monographs: British Conservatism: The Philosophy and Politics of Inequality, and House of Lords Reform since 1911. These are scheduled for 2010 and 2011 publication respectively. He has also published over 60 journal articles and chapters in edited books.

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