Challenges to Linearization

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Theresa Biberauer, Ian Roberts
Walter de Gruyter, Mar 22, 2013 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 385 pages
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The ten contributions in this volume focus on a range of linearization challenges, all of which aim to shed new light on the central, still largely mysterious question of how the abundant evidence that linguistic structures are hierarchically organised can plausibly be reconciled with the fact that actually realised linguistic strings are typically sequentially ordered. Some of the contributions present particularly challenging data, those on the mixed spoken and signed output of bimodal Italian children, Quechua nominal morphology, Kannada reduplication and Taqbaylit of Chemini “floating prepositions” all being cases in point. Others have a typological focus, highlighting and attempting to explain striking patterns like the Final-over-Final Constraint or considering the predictions of particular theoretical approacesh (the movement theory of Control, multidominance, Distributed Morphology) in relation to structures that we do and don’t expect to be “possible linguistic structures”. Broader architectural questions also receive attention from various perspectives.

This volume will be of interest to advanced students and researchers with interests in the externalisation of ling

 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Three types of linearization and the temporal aspects of speech
31
Backward dependencies must be short
57
Simultaneous mixing in the production of bimodal bilinguals
93
Multiple multiple spellout
129
Linearization and postsyntactic operations in the Quechua DP
171
Unattested word orders and leftbranching structure
211
A typology
235
Linearizing multidominance structures
269
The puzzles of whquestions with coordinated whpronouns
295
Light prepositions in Taqbaylit of Chemini
331
Index
377
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About the author (2013)

Theresa Biberauer, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England and Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa; Ian Roberts, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, England.