Cheshire antiquities, Roman, baronial, and monastic: a re-publ. of orig. copper plates, engr. by J. Strutt, with descriptions &c. By C. Hulbert

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Page 55 - Now therefore in the sight of all Israel the congregation of the LORD, and in the audience of our God', keep and seek for all the commandments of the LORD your God...
Page 12 - Lacy, his constable, for assistance. This officer was at that time attending the fair, and being assisted by Ralph Dutton, his son-in-law, collected immediately a numerous body of the rabble, who had met together in consequence of the privilege : with this motley company, he advanced...
Page 3 - ... advancing from Northumberland took possession of Chester, and seized the fortress : the Saxons under Alfred however having arrived in the vicinity, by destroying the cattle and corn, and intercepting the provisions of the Danes, drove them to such extremities of famine, that they quitted the city and retreated to North Wales. Upon the division of England into three districts by Alfred, Cheshire was included in the Mercian jurisdiction. Cheshire acquired the privileges of a county palatine in...
Page 7 - A' man upon his tower, with a flag in his hand, cryede them aime whilst they discharged their cannon, saying ' wide, my lord on the right hand; — now wide two yards on the left; — two yards over, my lord, &c.
Page 2 - From Bangor bridge the Dee is navigable for barges. At Chester bridge it is 100 yards wide, and vessels of considerable tonnage can pass by the new channel to Chester. The whole length of the course of the Dee is about 55 miles. It supplies salmon, trout, and other kinds of common fish. This river, called in Latin Deva, in...
Page 4 - ... parliament abandoned all their garrisons, except Tarvin and Nantwich, and, on the 27th of September, the battle of Rowton and Hooleheath was fought near Chester, in which the royalists were defeated ; an event which led to the surrender of the garrison of Chester, in February, 1646, and the subjugation of the whole county to the parliament. In August, 1659, Sir George Booth, having a secret commission from Charles II., appointing him...
Page 3 - Welsh, tliB city of Chester was the usual place of rendezvous for the English army, and the county was exposed to all the evils of a border warfare. In 1237, on the death of John Scot, the seventh earl of Chester of the Norman line, without male issue, Henry III. gave the daughters of the late earl other lands in lieu of the earldom, being unwilling, as he said, to 'parcel out...
Page 12 - The cathedral is situated on the east side of North-gate-street. It was originally a nunnery, founded by Walphenes, King of the Mercians, for his daughter St. Werburgh, to whom it is dedicated. It afterwards became the abbey church of a monastery of Benedictines, founded by Hugh Lupus.
Page 11 - When thou passest through the waters, I will be with thee : and through the rivers they shall not overflow thee : when thou walkest through the fire, thou shall not be burned, neither shall the flames kindle upon thee.
Page 28 - A little before day, captain Sandford (a zealous royalist) who came out of Ireland with eight of his firelocks, crept up the steep hill of Beeston castle and got into the upper ward, and took possession there. It must be done by treachery, for the place was most impregnable. Capt. Steel, who kept it for the parliament, was accused and suffered for it...

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