Chomsky on Democracy & Education

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Psychology Press, 2003 - Education - 480 pages
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This volume gathers a range of Chomsky's writings, some previously unpublished and not readily available to the general public. Chomsky outlines a philosophy of education steeped in the liberal tradition of John Dewey, more concerned with cultivating responsible citizens than feeding children facts. The goal of education, Chomsky argues, is to produce free human beings whose values are not accumulation and domination, but rather free association on terms of equality.
 

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Contents

Chomskys educationfordemocracy
1
The student of culture and history and the activist
8
Democracy and education October 1994
25
Things no amount of learning can teach November 1983
45
Language as a key to human nature and society 1975
58
A really new way of looking at language November 1987
65
Perspectives on language and mind October 1999
73
Rationalityscience and postthisorthat October 1992
87
Propaganda and control of the public mind February 1997
226
Prospects for democracy March 1994
236
Some thoughts on intellectuals and the schools June 1966
263
The responsibility of a university community May 311969
276
Remarks before the MIT Commission on MIT Education
284
Two roles of the American university 1997
305
The universities and the corporations May 1973
332
Some observations on the teaching of language September 1969
341

language development human intelligence
100
Two conceptions of social organization February 161970
126
Some tasks for responsible people August 1969
150
Toward a humanistic conception of education April 1971
163
The function of the university in a time of crisis 1969
178
Scholarship and commitment then and now December 1999
195
The mechanisms and practices of indoctrination December 1984
202
Central America as a test case April 1989
217
Language theory and language teaching August 1966
348
Our understanding of language and the curriculum 1964
357
Language theory and language use 1981
368
Language politics and composition 1991
374
Editors notes
411
References
437
Index
465
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About the author (2003)

Noam Chomsky was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 7, 1928. Son of a Russian emigrant who was a Hebrew scholar, Chomsky was exposed at a young age to the study of language and principles of grammar. During the 1940s, he began developing socialist political leanings through his encounters with the New York Jewish intellectual community. Chomsky received his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, where he studied linguistics, mathematics, and philosophy. He conducted much of his research at Harvard University. In 1955, he began teaching at MIT, eventually holding the Ferrari P. Ward Chair of Modern Language and Linguistics. Today Chomsky is highly regarded as both one of America's most prominent linguists and most notorious social critics and political activists. His academic reputation began with the publication of Syntactic Structures in 1957. Within a decade, he became known as an outspoken intellectual opponent of the Vietnam War. Chomsky has written many books on the links between language, human creativity, and intelligence, including Language and Mind (1967) and Knowledge of Language: Its Nature, Origin, and Use (1985). He also has written dozens of political analyses, including Manufacturing Consent: The Political Economy of the Mass Media (1988), Chronicles of Dissent (1992), and The Prosperous Few and the Restless Many (1993).

Otero is Emeritus Professor or Romance Linguistics at UCLA.