Citizenship and Civil Society: A Framework of Rights and Obligations in Liberal, Traditional, and Social Democratic Regimes

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Cambridge University Press, Feb 13, 1998 - Political Science - 316 pages
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Rights and obligations are confusing. When people really want or need something they call it a right. Can they simply attach this word to anything they want? Can people disregard obligations with impunity? This books argues that they can not. Rights and obligations are systematically related in important ways backed by the state. One must understand those relationships in specific ways to know what can or can not be done with rights and obligations in public discourse and politics. They must create a web of interaction between citizens so that more long term social investments may be made.
 

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Contents

Introduction to Citizenship
1
The Framing of Citizenship Rights Expansion Clarification and Meaning
28
Reconstructing Obligations and Patriotism Limitations Sanctions and Exchange in a System of Rights
52
CitizenSelves in Restricted and Generalized Exchange
75
The Balance of Rights and Obligations through Nesting Civil Society and Social Closure
104
Incremental Change in Citizenship over Decades Power Resources State Structures Ideology and External Forces
142
Momentous Change in Citizenship over Centuries From Wasps to Locomotives in the Development and Sequencing of Rights
173
Conclusion and Implications
217
Notes
237
References
267
Subject Index
299
Name Index
311
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