Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for ADHD in Adolescents and Adults: A Psychological Guide to Practice

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John Wiley & Sons, Apr 30, 2012 - Psychology - 301 pages
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The first edition of this book introduced the Young-Bramham Programme, a pioneering approach to cognitive behavioural treatment for ADHD in adults, which was well-received by clinical and academic communities alike. Based on the latest findings in the field, the authors have expanded the second edition to incorporate treatment strategies not only for adults, but also for adolescents with ADHD.
  • Updates the proven Young-Bramham Programme to be used not only with adults but also with adolescents, who are making the difficult transition from child to adult services
  • New edition of an influential guide to treating ADHD beyond childhood which encompasses the recent growth in scientific knowledge of ADHD along with published treatment guidelines
  • Chapter format provides a general introduction, a description of functional deficits, assessment methods, CBT solutions to the problem, and a template for group delivery
 

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Contents

CORE SYMPTOM MODULES
37
COMORBID AND ASSOCIATED PROBLEM MODULES
109
Frustration and Anger Module
182
LowMood and Depression Module
203
Sleep Module
221
Substance Misuse Module
243
THE FUTURE MODULE
267
References
285
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About the author (2012)

Susan Young is a Senior Lecturer in Forensic Clinical Psychology at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, and an Honorary Consultant Clinical and Forensic Psychologist at Broadmoor Hospital. In 1994 Susan set up the clinical psychology service at the Maudsley Hospital National Adult ADHD service. She was a member of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) ADHD Clinical Guideline Development Group, and is Vice-President of the UK Adult ADHD Network.

Jessica Bramham is a Lecturer in Clinical Neuropsychology in the School of Psychology, University College Dublin. She also leads the Adult ADHD Service at St Patrick's University Hospital Dublin. She previously co-ordinated the National Adult ADHD Service at the Maudsley Hospital in London and was a Clinical Lecturer at the Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London. Jessica is involved in researching cognitive functioning and the presentation of comorbid disorders in adults with ADHD.

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