Cold War, Deadly Fevers: Malaria Eradication in Mexico, 1955–1975

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Woodrow Wilson Center Press, May 4, 2007 - History - 264 pages

In the mid-1950s, with planning and funding from the United States, Mexico embarked on an ambitious campaign to eradicate malaria, which was widespread and persistent. This new history explores the politics of that campaign. Marcos Cueto describes the international basis of the program, its national organization in Mexico, its local implementation by health practitioners and workers, and its reception among the population. Drawing on archives in the United States, Mexico, and Switzerland, he highlights the militant Cold War rhetoric of the founders and analyzes the mixed motives of participants at all levels. Following the story through the dwindling campaign in the late 1960s and early 1970s, Cueto raises questions relevant to today’s international health campaigns against malaria, AIDS, and tuberculosis.

 

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Contents

Global Designs
15
National Decisions
70
Local Responses
112
The Return of Malaria and
159
Notes
167
Bibliography
225
Index
253
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About the author (2007)

Marcos Cueto is a professor in the department of sociomedical sciences, School of Public Health, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia in Lima. A historian with a Ph.D. from Columbia University, he has specialized in the history of public health in Latin America, with work on HIV/AIDS, malaria, the Pan American Health Organization, and the Rockefeller Foundation. He was a Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in 2004–2005.

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