Colonel Albert Pope and His American Dream Machines: The Life and Times of a Bicycle Tycoon Turned Automotive Pioneer

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McFarland, Nov 11, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 263 pages
   In the 1890s Colonel Albert A. Pope was hailed as a leading American automaker. That his name is not a household word today is the very essence of his story.   Pope's production methods as the world's largest manufacturer of bicycles led to the building of automobiles with lightweight metals, rubber tires, precision machining, interchangeable parts, and vertical integration. The founder of the Good Roads Movement, Pope entered automobile manufacturing while steam, electricity, and gasoline power were still vying for supremacy. The story of his failed dream of dominating U.S. automobile production is an engrossing view into America's industrial history.
 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
1
Lumbering Is What Popes Do
19
A Bloody Crucible
33
He Casts His Lot
58
Wheels for All
66
Milking the Market
91
Indispensable Roads
115
The Wunderkind
124
Like a Dog with a Bone
166
Triumphant Return
181
Parting
201
Leaving His Mark
207
The Ford Enigma
233
Bibliography
241
Index
247
Copyright

A Patented Formula
143

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About the author (2000)

Stephen B. Goddard practices law and teaches history and public policy at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut. The author of three books, he also writes for HistoryWire.com.

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