Commentary on Matthew (The Fathers of the Church, Volume 117)

Front Cover
CUA Press, 2008 - Religion - 347 pages
In this commentary, Jerome calls attention to the activity of the Trinity as a principal unifying theme of the Gospel of Matthew.
 

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With a superb introduction and a precise yet idiomatically elegant English translation, even the high expectations which his other works have led one to expect have been exceeded by this deservedly definitive volume. (It should be noted that contrary to what was known to Sheck in 2008, the commentary of Fortunatianus has survived, and, as of March 2015, is being prepared for publication.) 

Contents

Introduction
3
The Origenist Controversies
13
Origen
19
Themes ofJeromes Commentary on Matthew
30
Influence and Printed Editions
46
Book One Matthew 1 110
59
Matthew 9
106
Matthew
115
Matthew 16 continued 189 Matthew 20
222
197 Matthew 21
230
206 Matthew 22
248
Book Four Matthew 22 4128 20
257
Matthew 22 continued 257 Matthew 26
291
214
293
258 Matthew 27
308
269 Matthew 28
324

Book Two Matthew 11 216 12
128
128 Matthew 14
166
138 Matthew 15
177
151 Matthew 16
186
General Index
331
Index of Holy Scripture
337
Index of Greek Words Cited
347
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Jerome was the greatest scholar of the ancient church. Most of his mature life was spent in study in various parts of the Eastern Mediterranean. In approximately 372, he set out for the East and stayed in Antioch for a short period, eventually settling as a hermit in the Syrian desert for four or five years. He then spent some time in Constantinople and in 382 returned to Rome, where he became secretary to Pope Damasus. During his brief residence in Rome, he began his revision of the Bible into Latin translated from the original languages. The culmination of his work, which took over two decades, was known as the Vulgate, a Latin translation of the Bible. He returned to the East in 385 and eventually settled in Bethlehem, where he ruled a newly founded monastery and devoted the rest of his life to study and writing. In addition to the Vulgate, his writings include biblical commentaries and treatises concerning linguistic and topographical material written in order to help in the interpretation of Scripture.

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