Computer Simulation Using Particles

Front Cover
CRC Press, Mar 24, 2021 - Science - 540 pages
Computer simulation of systems has become an important tool in scientific research and engineering design, including the simulation of systems through the motion of their constituent particles. Important examples of this are the motion of stars in galaxies, ions in hot gas plasmas, electrons in semiconductor devices, and atoms in solids and liquids. The behavior of the system is studied by programming into the computer a model of the system and then performing experiments with this model. New scientific insight is obtained by observing such computer experiments, often for controlled conditions that are not accessible in the laboratory.

Computer Simulation using Particles deals with the simulation of systems by following the motion of their constituent particles. This book provides an introduction to simulation using particles based on the NGP, CIC, and P3M algorithms and the programming principles that assist with the preparations of large simulation programs based on the OLYMPUS methodology. It also includes case study examples in the fields of astrophysics, plasmas, semiconductors, and ionic solids as well as more detailed mathematical treatment of the models, such as their errors, dispersion, and optimization.

This resource will help you understand how engineering design can be assisted by the ability to predict performance using the computer model before embarking on costly and time-consuming manufacture.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

IV
1
V
2
VI
4
VII
6
VIII
9
IX
10
X
13
XI
14
CXIV
260
CXV
262
CXVI
264
CXVII
265
CXVIII
267
CXXI
269
CXXII
271
CXXIII
272

XII
15
XIII
18
XIV
21
XV
22
XVI
24
XVII
26
XIX
28
XX
30
XXI
31
XXII
32
XXIII
33
XXIV
34
XXV
35
XXVI
38
XXVIII
40
XXIX
42
XXX
44
XXXIII
45
XXXIV
47
XXXV
48
XXXVI
58
XXXVII
60
XXXVIII
62
XXXIX
90
XL
91
XLI
92
XLII
94
XLIII
95
XLIV
96
XLV
97
XLVI
100
XLVII
104
XLVIII
106
XLIX
107
L
111
LI
114
LII
117
LIII
120
LIV
121
LV
123
LVI
125
LVII
127
LVIII
128
LIX
129
LX
135
LXI
141
LXII
142
LXIII
147
LXIV
149
LXV
152
LXVI
153
LXVII
160
LXVIII
162
LXIX
164
LXX
166
LXXI
169
LXXII
171
LXXIII
174
LXXIV
178
LXXVI
179
LXXVII
180
LXXVIII
181
LXXIX
182
LXXX
185
LXXXI
186
LXXXII
188
LXXXIII
194
LXXXIV
195
LXXXV
198
LXXXVI
199
LXXXVII
201
LXXXVIII
205
LXXXIX
208
XC
211
XCI
214
XCII
215
XCIII
219
XCIV
221
XCV
222
XCVI
224
XCVII
225
XCIX
226
C
229
CI
231
CII
236
CIII
241
CV
242
CVI
244
CVII
247
CIX
252
CX
253
CXI
254
CXII
255
CXIII
256
CXXIV
273
CXXV
277
CXXVI
278
CXXVII
279
CXXVIII
281
CXXIX
283
CXXX
284
CXXXI
286
CXXXII
289
CXXXIII
293
CXXXIV
295
CXXXV
296
CXXXVI
299
CXXXVII
301
CXXXVIII
305
CXXXIX
306
CXL
308
CXLI
309
CXLII
313
CXLIII
314
CXLIV
316
CXLV
318
CXLVI
323
CXLVII
324
CXLVIII
329
CXLIX
333
CL
337
CLI
338
CLII
339
CLIII
342
CLIV
344
CLV
346
CLVI
347
CLVII
351
CLVIII
353
CLXI
354
CLXII
358
CLXIII
363
CLXV
367
CLXVI
368
CLXVII
370
CLXVIII
372
CLXIX
374
CLXXI
377
CLXXII
383
CLXXIII
384
CLXXV
390
CLXXVI
393
CLXXVII
397
CLXXVIII
400
CLXXIX
405
CLXXX
407
CLXXXI
409
CLXXXII
410
CLXXXIII
411
CLXXXIV
412
CLXXXV
414
CLXXXVI
417
CLXXXVIII
418
CLXXXIX
421
CXC
422
CXCI
424
CXCII
426
CXCIII
429
CXCIV
431
CXCV
438
CXCVI
439
CXCVII
440
CXCVIII
442
CXCIX
444
CC
446
CCI
455
CCII
456
CCIII
459
CCIV
460
CCV
461
CCVI
465
CCVII
467
CCIX
472
CCX
474
CCXI
480
CCXII
481
CCXIII
486
CCXIV
488
CCXV
493
CCXVI
496
CCXVII
499
CCXXI
501
CCXXIII
502
CCXXV
505
CCXXX
507
CCXXXI
508
CCXXXII
509
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 520 - PK, and Moshman, J., Monte Carlo calculation of noise near the potential minimum of a high-frequency diode, J.
Page 521 - Equations for the Solution of General Elliptic Problems. In Sparse Matrices and Their Applications (DJ Rose and RA Willoughby, eds.), Plenum Press, New York, 1972, pp.
Page 513 - A two-dimensional analysis of gallium arsenide junction field effect transistors with long and short channels,
Page 521 - Two-dimensional numerical analysis of stability criteria of GaAs FETs.
Page 515 - Kittel, C. [1971] Introduction to Solid State Physics, 4th ed (John Wiley & Sons, Inc.; New York, London, Sydney).

About the author (2021)

Roger Hockney obtained his BA and MA in the Natural Science Tripos (Physics) from Cambridge University and his PhD in ‘Numerical Analysis and Plasma Physics’ from Stanford University. He was Professor of Computer Science at Reading University, England, from 1970 to 1985 when he led a research team, supported by the UK Science Research Council, developing simulation methods using particles and implementing them on the new generation of parallel computers. In 1985, he took early retirement in order to concentrate on his own work, and accept visiting appointments.

James Eastwood acquired his BSc and PhD from Imperial College, London University. From 1972 to 1978 he worked with Professor Hockney at Reading University, and since 1978 he has pursued computational plasma physics research at Culham Laboratory. He is currently Editor of the Journal of Computer Physics Communications and a Committee member of The Institute of Physics Computational Physics Group.

Bibliographic information