Conflict: Resolution and Provention

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Macmillan, 1990 - Arbitration (International law) - 295 pages
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"Superpower detente at the international level has focused new attention on the unresolved, deep-rooted conflicts that are increasingly tearing apart families, communities and nations. How can the intercommunal conflicts currently devastating much of the world be resolved? How can the 'war on crime' be won? How can the members of different ethnic, social religious, class and sexual groupings learn to live together in harmony? In Conflict: Resolution and Provention the founder of the field of conflict resolution develops a theory that promises practical answers to these questions: a theory of basic human needs. John Burton demonstrates convincingly that traditional techniques of social control cannot resolve conflicts based on unsatisfied human needs. He goes on to show how problem-solving processes derived from human needs theory can revolutionize legal, political, diplomatic and military approaches to deep-rooted conflict. And he makes good the bold claim that such processes can not only resolve but also 'provent' conflict by eliminating its causes before the effects become murderous. This book will be of vital interest to all those concerned either as students or professionals with understanding and dealing with human conflict, whether they be lawyers or psychologists, political scientists or clergy, industrial relations specialists or diplomats. Conflict: Resolution and Provention is an overview of the subject that can be used in conjunction with the three other books in The Conflict Series to form a small library in this crucially important emerging field"--Back cover.

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Contents

PARTI THE APPROACH
9
The Human Dimension
25
Human Needs Theory
36
Copyright

18 other sections not shown

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