Considerations on Negro Slavery: With Authentic Reports, Illustrative of the Actual Condition of the Negroes in Demerara. Also ... in Trinidad

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, Brown, and Green, 1824 - Slavery - 338 pages
 

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Page 95 - Is not the whole land before thee? separate thyself, I pray thee, from me : if thou wilt take the left hand, then I will go to the right ; or if thou take the right hand, then I will go to the left.
Page 255 - ... to perform any labour of any kind or nature whatsoever ; or shall carry or exhibit upon any plantation, or elsewhere, any such whip, cat, or other instrument as aforesaid, as a mark or emblem of their, his, or her authority over any slave or slaves, the person or persons so offending, and each and every person who shall or may direct, authorize, instigate, procure, or be aiding, assisting, or abetting in any such illegal driving, or...
Page 116 - Phousdar seizes upon the greatest share of the Zemindar's collections, and then secures the favour of his Nabob by voluntary contributions, which leave him not possessed of the half of his rapines and exactions : the Nabob fixes his rapacious eye on every portion of wealth which appears in his province, and never fails to carry off part of it : by large deductions from these acquisitions, he purchases security from his superiors, or maintains it against them at the expense of a war. — Subject to...
Page 255 - And it is further ordered and declared, That it is, and shall henceforth be, illegal for any Person or Persons within the said Island of Trinidad, to carry any whip, cat, or other instrument of the like nature, while superintending the labour of any Slaves...
Page 115 - Imitation has conveyed the unhappy system of oppression which prevails in the government of Indostan throughout all ranks of the people, from the highest even to the lowest subject of the empire. Every head of a village calls his habitation the Durbar, and plunders of their meal and roots the wretches of his precinct: from him the Zemindar extorts the small pittance of silver, which his penurious tyranny has scraped together: the...
Page 239 - These things they said were no comfort to them. God had made them of the same flesh and blood as the whites, that they were tired of being slaves to them, that they should be free and they would not work any more.
Page 255 - ... upon any plantation within the said island, or to use any such whip, cat, or other instrument for the purpose of impelling or coercing any slaves or slave to perform any labour of any kind or nature whatever, or to carry or exhibit upon any plantation, or elsewhere, any such whip, cat, or other instrument of the like nature as a mark or emblem of the authority of the person or persons so carrying or exhibiting the same over any slaves or slave ; and in case any person or persons shall carry any...
Page 107 - ... without permission of the superior on whom they depended ; they were conveyed, together with the lands on which they were settled, from one proprietor to another-; and were bound to cultivate the ground, and to perform several kinds of servile work m.
Page 255 - ... within the said island, or shall use any such whip, cat, or other instrument as aforesaid, for the purpose of impelling or coercing any slave or slaves to perform any labour of any kind or nature whatsoever ; or shall carry or exhibit upon any plantation, or elsewhere, any such whip, cat, or other instrument as aforesaid, as a mark or emblem of their, his, or her authority over any slave or slaves, the person or persons so offending, and each and every person who shall or may direct, authorize...
Page 113 - ... as affect the policy of that district, and are at the same time of too infamous or of too insignificant a nature to be admitted before the more solemn tribunal of the Durbar. These ministers of justice are called the Catwall ; and a building bearing the same name is allotted for their constant resort. • At this place are perpetually heard the clamours of the populace : some demanding redress for the injury of a blow or a bad name ; others for a fraud in the commerce of farthings : one wants...

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