Critique of Dialectical Reason, Volume 1

Front Cover
At the height of the Algerian war, Jean-Paul Sartre embarked on a fundamental reappraisal of his philosophical and political thought. The result was the Critique of Dialectical Reason, an intellectual masterpiece of the twentieth century, now republished with a major original introduction by Fredric Jameson. In it, Sartre set out the basic categories for the renovated theory of history that he believed was necessary for post-war Marxism.

Sartre's formal aim was to establish the dialectical intelligibility of history itself, as what he called 'a totalisation without a totaliser'. But, at the same time, his substantive concern was the structure of class struggle and the fate of mass movements of popular revolt, from the French Revolution at the end of the eighteenth century to the Russian and Chinese revolutions in the twentieth: their ascent, stabilisation, petrification and decline, in a world still overwhelmingly dominated by scarcity.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

EDITORs NOTE
xi
I
15
CRITIQUE OF CRITICAL INVESTIGATION
42
INDIVIDUAL PRAXIS AS TOTALISATION
79
The Negation of the Negation
89
HUMAN RELATIONS AS A MEDIATION
95
Reciprocity Exploitation and Repression
109
ii Scarcity and Marxism
140
THE STATUTORY GROUP
405
The Pledge
417
Fraternity and Fear
428
VI
445
THE CONSTITUTED DIALECTIC
505
Spontaneity and Command
519
Praxis as Process
539
Taylorism
559

Worked Matter as the Alienated Objectification
153
IV
161
Investigation
220
Class Being
228
COLLECTIVES
253
the Radio Broadcast
270
the Free Market
277
the Great Fear
293
the French Proletariat
307
Collective Praxis
318
THE FUSED GROUP
345
The Storming of the Bastille
351
The Third Party and the Group
363
The Intelligibility of the Fused Group
382
THE INSTITUTION
576
Purges and Terror
583
Institutionalisation and Inertia
599
Institutionalisation and Sovereignty
607
States and Societies
635
the Top Ten
642
Bureaucracy and the Cult of Personality
655
THE PLACE OF HISTORY
664
CLASS STRUGGLE AND DIALECTICAL REASON
735
a Totaliser
805
ANNEXE
821
GLOSSARY
827
COMPARATIVE PAGINATION CHART 836
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Jean-Paul Sartre was a prolific philosopher, novelist, public intellectual, biographer, playwright and founder of the journal Les Temps Modernes. Born in Paris in 1905 and died in 1980, Sartre was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1964--and turned it down. His books include Nausea, Intimacy, The Flies, No Exit, Sartre's War Diaries, Critique of Dialectical Reason, and the monumental treatise Being and Nothingness.

Fredric Jameson is Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature at Duke University. The author of numerous books, he has over the last three decades developed a richly nuanced vision of Western culture's relation to political economy. He was a recipient of the 2008 Holberg International Memorial Prize. He is the author of many books, including Postmodernism, Or, The Cultural Logic of Late Capitalism, The Cultural Turn, A Singular Modernity, The Modernist Papers, Archaeologies of the Future, Brecht and Method, Ideologies of Theory, Valences of the Dialectic, The Hegel Variations and Representing Capital.

Bibliographic information