DIY: The Rise of Lo-fi Culture

Front Cover
Marion Boyars, 2008 - Music - 357 pages
This exploration of lo-fi culture traces the origin of the DIY ethic to the skiffle movement of the 1950s, mail art, Black Mountain poetry, and avant-garde art in the 1950s. It follows the punk scene of the 1970s and 1980s to the current music scene. It charts the development of music outside of the publicity machine and examines the politics behind the production of "homemade" recordings and publications. - - A well informed study that champions the unsung heroes and heroines of DIY distribution in art, music, literary zines and culture. This exploration of lo-fi culture traces the origin of the DIY ethic to the skiffle movement of the 1950s, mail art, Black Mountain poetry and Avant-Garde art in the 1950s, the punk scene of the 1970s and 80s, right the way through to the current music scene. Through interviews with key writers, promoters and musicians (including Bikini Kill and Bratmobile) Amy charts the development of music outside of the publicity machine of the large companies, and examines the politics behind the production of the many 'home-made' recordings and publications available today.

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User Review  - amelish - LibraryThing

Why does this book suck so much? It manages to make a fascinating modern Western subculture horrendously boring. I'm not putting much thought into this review but am still having more fun than when ... Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Amy Spencer is co-founder of the creative collective The Bakery and a promoter of various music and arts events in London. She is currently launching a monthly club night for the band Electrelane. As well as working on her PhD about literary representations of London, she is a volunteer at the Museum of Immigration and Diversity in Spitalfields.

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