Daoist Identity: Cosmology, Lineage, and Ritual

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Livia Kohn, Harold David Roth
University of Hawaii Press, 2002 - Philosophy - 333 pages

Daoist Identity is an exploration of the various means by which Daoists over the centuries have created an identity for themselves. Using modern sociological studies of identity formation as its foundation, it brings together a representative sample of in-depth analyses by eminent American and Japanese scholars in the field.

The discussion begins with critical examinations of the ways identity was found among the early movements of the Way of Great Peace and the Celestial Masters. The role of sacred texts and literary culture in Daoist identity formation is discussed. The volume then focuses on lineage formation and the increasing role of popular religious practices, such as spirit-writing, in modern Daoism since the Song dynasty. Finally it discusses the Daoist adaptation and reinterpretation of Buddhist rites, such as the feeding of souls in hell and the use of ritual gestures, and the changes made in contemporary Daoism in relation to traditional rites and popular practices.

Contributors: Asano Haruji, Suzanne Cahill, M. Csikszentmihalyi, Edward L. Davis, Terry F. Kleeman, Livia Kohn, Mabuchi Masaya, Maruyama Hiroshi, Mitamura Keiko, Mori Yuria, Peter Nickerson, Charles D. Orzech, Harold D. Roth, Shiga Ichiko, Tsuchiya Masaaki.

 

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Contents

Acknowledgments
9
TERRY F KLEEMAN Ethnic Identity and Daoist
23
TSUCHIYA MASAAKI Confession of Sins and Awareness
39
Exorcism
58
MARK CSIKSZENTMIHALYI
81
The
149
The Taiyi
165
SHIGA ICHIKO Manifestations of LCiu in Modern
185
Translation
213
1L MITAMURA KEIKO Daoist Hand Signs and Buddhist
235
MARUVAMA HIROSHI Documents Used in Rituals of Merit
256
ASANO HARUJI Offerings in Daoist Ritual
274
Glossary
295
Names of Authors Cited
309
Copyright

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Page 11 - Commitment. next, is denned as the "focused emotion or emotional attachment to a specific focus of identity. It is an anchoring of the emotions in a salient system of meaning — social, group, or personal, whether abstract or concrete

About the author (2002)

Livia Kohn, Ph.D., is professor emerita of Religion and East Asian Studies at Boston University. The author or editor of over 40 books, she now lives in Florida, serves as the executive editor of the Journal of Daoist Studies, and runs various workshops and conferences. Her specialty is medieval Daoism and the study of Chinese longevity practices. She has written and edited numerous books and is a long-term practitioner of taiji quan, qigong, yoga, and meditation.

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