Destiny's Landfall: A History of Guam

Front Cover
University of Hawaii Press, 1995 - History - 380 pages
Ferdinand Magellan's fateful landfall on Guam, the first inhabited Pacific island known to Europeans, ushered in the age of European exploration in the Pacific and led inexorably to foreign domination of every traditional island society throughout Oceania. In the centuries after Magellan's landing in 1521, Guam became a small green oasis for alien priests, soldiers, traders, pirates, and other expatriates. Destiny's Landfall tells the story of this colorful cavalcade of outsiders and of the indigenous Chamorro people who, in a remarkable feat of resiliency, maintained their language and their identity despite three centuries of colonial domination by three of history's most powerful nation-states: Spain, Japan, and the United States.
Today, international airlines, nuclear-powered submarines, and satellite tracking stations have replaced Spanish galleons. But though Americanized, modernized, and multiethnic, Guam continues to fulfill the geopolitical role imposed on it by outsiders. In this comprehensive look at one of the world's last colonies, Robert E. Rogers evokes the dramatic but little-known saga of Guam's people - from the precontact era to Spanish domination, from colonial rule under a U.S. naval government to the massive military invasions of World War II, and on through the booms and busts, the scandals and victories experienced by Guamanians in their still-unfulfilled quest to regain control of their future.

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Contents

V
3
VI
19
VII
39
VIII
56
IX
72
X
86
XI
106
XII
125
XVI
202
XVII
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XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
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XXV
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Copyright

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Page 111 - The civil rights and political status of the native inhabitants of the territories hereby ceded to the United States shall be determined by the Congress.
Page 112 - ... the strong arm of authority, to repress disturbance and to overcome all obstacles to the bestowal of the blessings of good and stable government upon the people of the Philippine islands under the free flag of the United States.
Page 111 - Guam, and in the Philippine Archipelago, all the buildings, wharves, barracks, forts, structures, public highways and other immovable property which, in conformity with law, belong to the public domain, and as such belong to the Crown of Spain.
Page 111 - Stands of colors, uncaptured war vessels, small arms, guns of all calibres, with their carriages and accessories, powder, ammunition, live stock and materials and supplies of all kinds, belonging to the land and naval forces of Spain in the Philippines and Guam, remain the property of Spain.
Page 111 - Spain cedes to the United States the island of Porto Rico and other islands now under Spanish sovereignty in the West Indies, and the island of Guam in the Marianas or Ladrones.
Page 110 - The truth is I didn't want the Philippines, and when they came to us, as a gift from the gods, I did not know what to do with them.
Page 230 - States to perform other temporary services or labor, if unemployed persons capable of performing such service or labor cannot be found in this country...
Page 160 - Chances of favorable outcome of negotiations with Japan very doubtful. This situation coupled with statements of Japanese Government and movements their naval and military forces indicate in our opinion that a surprise aggressive movement in any direction including attack on Philippines or Guam is a possibility.
Page 124 - Whether a particular race will or will not assimilate with our people, and whether they can or cannot with safety to our institutions be brought within the operation of the Constitution, is a matter to be thought of when it is proposed to acquire their territory by treaty.
Page 112 - ... the mission of the United States is one of benevolent assimilation, substituting the mild sway of justice and right for arbitrary rule.

About the author (1995)

Robert F. Rogers has served as a professor at the University of Guam.

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