Dewey's Empirical Theory of Knowledge and Reality

Front Cover
Vanderbilt University Press, 2000 - Philosophy - 316 pages
0 Reviews
The ongoing revival of interest in the work of American philosopher and pragmatist John Dewey has given rise to a burgeoning flow of commentaries, critical editions, and reevaluations of Dewey's writings. While previous studies of Dewey's work have taken either a historical or a topical focus, Shook offers an innovative, organic approach to understanding Dewey and eloquently shows that Dewey's instrumentalism grew seamlessly out of his idealism. He argues that most current scholarship operates under a mistaken impression of Dewey's early philosophical positions and convincingly demonstrates a number of key points:

that Dewey's metaphysical empiricism remained more indebted to Kant and Hegel than is commonly supposed;
that Dewey owed more to the influence of Wundt than is commonly believed;
that the influence of Peirce and James was not as significant for the development of Dewey's theories of mind and truth as has been argued in the past;
and that Dewey's pragmatic theory of knowledge never really abandoned idealism.

Shook's exposition of the unity of Dewey's thought challenges a large scholarly industry devoted to suppressing or explaining away the consistency between Dewey's early thought and his later work. In every respect, Dewey's Empirical Theory of Knowledge and Reality is a provocative and engaging study that will occupy a unique niche in this field. It is certain to stimulate discussion and controversy, forcing Dewey traditionalists out of habitual modes of thought and transforming our conventional understanding of the development of classical American philosophy.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

THE OPPORTUNITY OF DEWEYS EARLY PHILOSOPHY
7
The Traditional Account of Deweys Development
11
The Problem of Deweys Early Philosophy
18
ABSOLUTE IDEALISM
21
Knowledge and the Psychological Standpoint
26
Psychology as Philosophic Method
58
Classifying Deweys Idealism
66
WUNDTIAN VOLUNTARISM
71
Moral Judgment and the Functionally Social Self
143
THE LOGIC OF CONDUCT
163
Reasoning and Experience
164
Intelligence and Knowledge
176
Experimental Science
194
THE RECONSTRUCTION OF EPISTEMOLOGY
217
An Empirical Theory of Meaning
218
An Empirical Theory of Knowledge
229

Organic Voluntarism and Technological Psychology
72
Knowledge and Will
88
The ReflexArc
106
The Foundations of Functionalism
113
THE ABSOLUTE OF ACTIVE EXPERIENCE
121
Absolute vs Functional Truth
124
The Self and Experience
132
An Empirical Process of Verification
252
Instrumentalist Naturalism
259
CHRONOLOGY OF SELECTED DEWEY WRITINGS
270
Notes
278
Bibliography
296
Index
308
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2000)

John Shook teaches philosophy at Corning Community College in New York.

Bibliographic information