Divine Hiddenness and Human Reason

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Cornell University Press, 2006 - Philosophy - 217 pages
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Why, if a loving God exists, are there "reasonable nonbelievers," people who fail to believe in God but through no fault of their own? In Part 1 of this book, the first full-length treatment of its topic, J. L. Schellenberg argues that when we notice how a relationship with God logically presupposes belief in God, we have grounds to conclude that there would be no reasonable nonbelievers if theism were true, and thus—given their existence—grounds for atheism. This argument, he maintains, is not defeated by any of an array of counterarguments seeking to justify divine hiddenness drawn from the work of such writers as Pascal, Kierkegaard, Butler, and Hick, and from the author's own imagination—arguments meticulously scrutinized in the book's second part. Divine Hiddenness and Human Reason has generated a great deal of interest and discussion since its first publication in 1993 and continues to set the agenda for work on its issues today.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Some Epistemic Implications of Divine Love
17
Is a Strong Epistemic Situation in Relation to Theism
44
The Reasonableness of Nonbelief
58
A Summation of the Case
83
Tlie Force of the Argument
95
Index
215
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

J. L. Schellenberg is Professor of Philosophy at Mount Saint Vincent University and Adjunct Professor in the Faculty of Graduate Studies at Dalhousie University. He is the author of Divine Hiddenness and Human Reason , Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion , The Wisdom to Doubt: A Justification of Religious Skepticism , and The Will to Imagine: A Justification of Skeptical Religion , all from Cornell.

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