Doubling the Point: Essays and Interviews

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Harvard University Press, 1992 - Literary Criticism - 438 pages
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Nadine Gordimer has written of J.M. Coetzee that his vision goes to the nerve-centre of being. What he finds there is more than most people will ever know about themselves, and he conveys it with a brilliant writer's mastery of tension and elegance. Doubling the Point takes the reader to the center of that vision. These essays and interviews, documenting Coetzee's longtime engagement with his own culture, and with modern culture in general, constitute a literary autobiography.
 

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Doubling the point: essays and interviews

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Coetzee is known here for his fiction, set in his native South Africa, but less so for his criticism. This collection of essays should enhance his reputation. Coetzee examines such literary giants as ... Read full review

Contents

Beckett
12
Murphy 1970
31
Interview
57
The First Sentence of Yvonne Burgess
91
Interview
103
The Burden of Consciousness in Africa 1977
115
Four Notes on Rugby 1978
121
Triangular Structures of Desire in Advertising 1980
127
Tolstoy
251
Interview
297
Censorship in South Africa 1990
315
Interview
335
Mans Fate in the Novels of Alex La Guma 1974
344
The Writer and the South
361
Athol Fugard Notebooks 19601977 1984
369
Breyten Breytenbach True Confessions
375

Interview
141
Scientific Language I 982
181
Interview
197
Time Tense and Aspect in Kafkas
210
Robert Musils Stories of Women 1986
233
Interview
243
Nadine Gordimer The Essential Gesture 1989
382
Interview
391
Notes
397
Sources and Credits
433
Copyright

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About the author (1992)

J.M. Coetzee's full name is John Michael Coetzee. Born in Cape Town, South Africa, in 1940, Coetzee is a writer and critic who uses the political situation in his homeland as a backdrop for many of his novels. Coetzee published his first work of fiction, Dusklands, in 1974. Another book, Boyhood, loosely chronicles an unhappy time in Coetzee's childhood when his family moved from Cape Town to the more remote and unenlightened city of Worcester. Other Coetzee novels are In the Heart of the Country and Waiting for the Barbarians. Coetzee's critical works include White Writing and Giving Offense: Essays on Censorship. Coetzee is a two-time recipient of the Booker Prize and in 2003, he won the Nobel Literature Award.

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