Elements of Medical Jurisprudence

Front Cover
J. Callow, 1814 - 139 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 38 - The consummation of a rape, by which is meant a complete, full, and entire coition which is made without any consent or permission of the woman, seems to be impossible unless some very extraordinary circumstances occur. For a woman always possesses sufficient power by drawing back her limbs and by the force of her hands to prevent the insertion of the penis while she can keep her resolution entire.
Page 15 - ... occasion great changes. Neither need we have recourse to the theory of the ingenious Buffon to explain how these are brought about; or suppose that every part of the human body has a representation in the fecundating quality of both parents, to form its construction. The first rudiments or germen of the human body is not a human creature, if it be even a living one; it is a foundation only upon which the human superstructure is raised. This is evident to anatomical observation. Were a child to...
Page 10 - " 5th. From its limbs, which are thin and weak, and the nails upon its fingers are soft, short, not extending beyond the fingers; nay, if it be very small, as of one or two months, the nails are by no means perceptible either upon the fingers or the toes. ' " 6th. From the conformation or constitution of its bones; for it is evident from experience, that in every month of gestation there is some alteration in this respect; ex. gr. in a foetus of five months, the orbits of the eyes are entirely formed...
Page 17 - The first is the male, who has in general his own organs tolerably perfect, but has some division in the flesh above, below, on, or in the scrotum, which puts on the appearance of the female pudendum. The penis likewise may be so obliterated, as to give no external appearance of the male; but the beard, and the constitution of his body, confirm him to be of that sex. The androgyna is a woman, who has the parts of generation nearly...
Page 18 - This is a very inconvenient dis. order, as she is sometimes deprived of the pleasures peculiar to her sex, and suffers much from disorders of the part. From her breasts, and the deficiency of beard, however, she is distinguished from the male; though it frequently and unfortunately happens, that such women are more subject than others to robust and masculine constitutions. It is evident that the sexes here are as completely marked as in other persons, and, to all legal intents and purposes, thcv...
Page 12 - ... though age may give some addition to their substance. " 4th. From the umbilical cord, which is thick and firm. " 5th. From other circumstances, opposite to those in that which was imperfect; such as that he cries, moves his limbs, opens his eyes, sucks at the breast, is not always asleep, can bear cold, has a white skin, can evacuate urine and the faeces,, has long nails, and his head covered with hair. " That which relates to the conformation of a child, after it is brought into the world, is...
Page 114 - ... temperament, and relaxed fibre. " 2d. When the disorder seizes them they become abject, fearful, fond of solitude, prone to anger, changeable in their opinions and desires, but fixing their attention upon a single object. " 3d. The belly is constipated, the urine is made in small quantities; the abdomen is distended with wind; a sharp acrid matter is discharged by vomiting; the pulse moves very slowly; the aliment is devoured with greediness; the imagination is perverted so as that they are persuaded...
Page 21 - To which we answer, that evidently it resides most conspicuously in the brain, because that substance being hurt, all the faculties of the soul become disordered; and because all the nerves of the body, which are the great instruments of action, are derived from it as a fountain. But it cannot be supposed that the whole of the brain is the immediate seat of the soul; it is probably confined to what is called the sensorium commune, or a small part from whence the nerves, destined to sense and voluntary...
Page 25 - ... great measure on the constitution, or rather the formation of the womb of the mother. " The last thing to be considered under this head of parturition, is the legitimacy or illegality of births; and this is divided into the time when a child is born after conception, and the conformation of its body. With respect to time, physically considered, (for laws may be as arbitrary as they please in this respect) all abortions, too early births, children of nine months, and those who are late born, even...
Page 39 - Jurisprudence, a text compiled for coroners and courts of law, suggests: without an excitation of lust, or the enjoyment of pleasure in the venereal act, no conception can probably take place.

Bibliographic information