'Entered at Stationers' hall', a sketch of the history and privileges of the Company of stationers

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1871
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Page 17 - ... and the learned, who can only judge whether there be any truth in this science, do all unanimously agree to laugh at and despise it; and none but the poor ignorant vulgar give it any credit, and that only upon...
Page 9 - Know ye," says this curious instrument, " that WE, considering and manifestly perceiving that several seditious and heretical Books, both in verse and prose, are daily published, stamped, and printed, by divers scandalous, schismatical, and heretical persons, not only exciting our subjects and liege-men to sedition and disobedience against us, our crown, and dignity, but also to the renewal and propagating very great and detestable heresies against the faith and sound Catholic doctrine of Holy Mother,...
Page 10 - Books and those things, which are or shall be printed or stamped contrary to the form of any statute, act, or proclamation, made, or to be made...
Page 24 - Sir, their almanacks have been, as every thing else that is monopolized must be, — uniform and obstinate in mistake and error, for want of the necessary rivalry. It is not worth their while to unset the press to correct mistakes, however gross and palpable, because they cannot affect the sale. If the moon is made to rise in the west, she may continue to rise there for ever.
Page 10 - ... .shop, house, chamber or building of any stamper, printer, binder or seller of any manner of books within the kingdom of England...
Page 18 - ... whether there be any truth in this science, do all unanimously agree to laugh at and despise it ; and none but the poor ignorant vulgar give it any credit, and that only upon the word of such silly wretches as I and my fellows, who can hardly write or read.
Page 23 - Almanac, published under the revision of the Archbishop of Canterbury and the Bishop of London, but I am prevented from doing it by a just respect for the House. Indeed, I know no house, but a brothel, that could suffer the quotation. The worst part of Rochester is ladies' reading when compared with them.
Page 18 - I can gather from you," said I, "the observations and predictions you printed with your almanacks were mere impositions on the people." He replied, "If it were otherwise, I should have the less to answer for. We have a common form for all those things: as to foretelling the weather, we never meddle with that, but leave it to the printer, who takes it out of any old...
Page 31 - Whereas it is expedient to amend the law relating to copyright, and to afford greater encouragement to the production of literary works of lasting benefit to the world...
Page 9 - ... seize, take away, have, burn, or convert to the proper use of the said society, all and singular those books and those things, which are or shall be printed or stamped...

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