Essential Works of Lenin: "What is to be Done?" and Other Writings

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, 1966 - History - 372 pages
1 Review
Among the most influential political and social forces of the 20th century, modern communism rests firmly on philosophical, political and economic underpinnings developed by Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov, later known as Lenin. In this volume, comprising the four works generally considered his most important publications, Lenin presents the goals and tactics of communism with remarkable directness and forcefulness.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Great! You must read that!
Good for you get know about Lenin. Then you would understand reason why.

Contents

Introduction
1
The Development of Capitalism in Russia
11
WhatIstoBeDoneI
54
IV
74
Politics
92
The Primitiveness of the Economists and
127
Imperialism the Highest Stage of Capitalism
177
The State and Revolution
271
The State and Revolution Experience
296
Continuation Supplementary Explana
313
Suggestions for Further Reading
365
Glossary of Russian Terms
371
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1966)

Creator of the former Soviet Union, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin (family name Ulianov) was born on April 10, 1870 in Simbirsk (later Ulianovsk), Russia, the son of a schools inspector. Lenin received upper class education and obtained a law degree in 1891, but he was moved to oppose the czarist Russian government, partly due to the execution of his brother, Alexander, who had participated in a plot to assassinate the Russian emperor. For taking part in revolutionary activities, Lenin was eventually imprisoned, publishing his work, The Development of Capitalism in Russia, from prison in 1899. Three years later, his pamphlet "What Is to Be Done" became the model for Communist philosophy. Lenin helped the Bolshevist movement that overthrew the czarist government and brought an end to Russia's war against Germany. As head of the new government, he put land in the hands of the peasants and brought industry under government control. An assassination attempt in 1918 wounded him, and two strokes in 1922 forced him to severely curtail government duty. He retreated to his country home in Gorki, where he died on January 21, 1924.

Bibliographic information