Europe's First Farmers

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 14, 2000 - Social Science - 395 pages
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Plants and animals originally domesticated in the Near East arrived in Europe between 7,000 and 4,000 BC. Was the new technology introduced by migrants, or was it an 'inside job'? How were the new species adapted to European conditions? What were the immediate and long-term consequences of the transition from hunting and gathering to farming? These central questions in the prehistory of Europe are discussed here by leading specialists, drawing on the latest scholarship in fields as diverse as genetics and IndoEuropean linguistics.
 

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Contents

Europes first farmers an introduction
1
Southeastern Europe in the transition to agriculture in Europe bridge buffer or mosaic
19
Transition to agriculture in eastern Europe
57
Cardial pottery and the agricultural transition in Mediterranean Europe
93
Mesolithic and Neolithic interaction in southern France and northern Italy new data and current hypotheses
117
From the Mesolithic to the Neolithic in the Iberian peninsula
144
The origins of agriculture in southcentral Europe
183
How agriculture came to northcentral Europe
197
Getting back to basics transitions to farming in Ireland and Britain
219
The introduction of farming in northern Europe
260
Lessons in the transition to agriculture
301
Bibliography
319
Index
377
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Page 331 - P. (1998) Reid's paradox of rapid plant migration: dispersal theory and interpretation of paleoecological records. BioScience 48, 13-24.
Page 326 - Peter 1996 The spread of early farming in Europe. American Scientist 84: 242—53.
Page 352 - The transition from Mesolithic to Early Neolithic in Southeastern and Eastern Europe: An Anthropological Outline. In: Hershkovitz I (ed.).

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